Episode 100 – David Pere and Alex Felice on The Military Millionaire Podcast

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Episode 100 – David Pere and Alex Felice on The Military Millionaire Podcast

 

00:00 - 05:00

Intro:

You're listening to the military millionaire podcast, a show about real estate investing for the working class. Stay tuned as we explore ways to help you improve your finances, build wealth through real estate and become a person that is worth knowing.

David:

I'm not even gonna give you a warning. We're going.

What's up military millionaires. I am your host David Pere. And this is your co host Alex Felice and you guys don't see this because we're not usually recording but on every single time we have a guest. At some point I get told to shut up and start recording because I'm taking too long prepping the podcast.

Well, today we are recording Episode 100 of the military millionaire podcast and Alex and I prepped fucking nothing and it is just gonna be us reminiscing and talking about where we started and how we got into real estate how we got into content how we got into wherever that this ends up and it's gonna be good. So that's a I'm not gonna introduce him. I'm just gonna roll right in Alex, when was the first time you realized real estate was it?

Alex:

Wow, I did not expect it asking that question.

David:

I just made it, I told you we didn't

Alex:

I don't know how much of a backstory I want to give here. Let's see.

Um, you know, there's a lot of people that are out there starting real estate or, you know, starting personal finance in their businesses and they're in their 20s. And, you know, that was not my story. I wasted my entire 20s drunk, and other things.

So, I got sick of that. As you I was lucky I got sick because a lot of people don't you know, a lot of people enjoy their whole lives so I got sick of it, not getting drunk but being my primary focus and so I found on personal finance first and I highly recommend that anybody who's going through the journey of real estate you start with personal finance, because well, my idea was, I'm really I'm really bad jumping around here.

The idea was, hey, look, I got to fix this money problem because I'm always stressed out about money. And so real estate was not the answer for me first, the answer was I got to learn about money.

If you understand something, then you can control it. So the idea was, let's go learn about money. So I started with personal finance. And then I went and got a finance degree. And then I worked at a bank because I figured, well, they know how the money works.

So if I can, I can work there then I'll learn how this works. And so I got started saving money. I ended up with like 15 grand which was a real lot for me at the time, and a house. What do I do with this? And that's when I started looking for things like, okay, more than just saving now I can now I'm in the black. You know, now I have some money, what do I do with it, so it was telling him 13 or so and so on. I remember where it was by having stumbled across you know, real estate.

The prices are depressed because of the recession. And I was like, look, I didn't want to start a business because I'm lazy as fuck. I didn't want employees because employees have the highest overhead event and liability of any expense in any business, I had to be passive like I'm lazy right? Well I want the right to reserve the right to be lazy at my convenience. I don't want to work today. I don't have to go. So I wanted that freedom had to be tried and true I really didn't want to start a business that was like you know a gamble not even a gamble just like some passion project that I was hoping would make money and ended up I was afraid that I end up hating it or it would change like starting an app or starting some like restaurants like those things are not long term you know restaurant that's a three to five year play. So I didn't want to stick a bunch of time into something and then have to rethink it in five or three, five years or just not work out so.

David:

I'm sorry...years into a restaurant and then fucking COVID happens and that would have worked out right for you.

Alex:

Hundred percent. So I was like, I don't want to do that in one place. How to be passive. I don't have any I didn't have that much money so it had to be able to use debt and it had to produce cash flow because my goal was freedom not equity. So like the stock market wasn't really where I was looking because you can't you gotta sit on those gains can't they don't pay every month Not really.

And surprisingly enough, there's something that fits all those boxes and that's real estate. So I dug in super hard. We bought a foreclosure in 2014 that I just got all in for $50,000 in that house and appraised 18 months later for 115 which again, was really good for me and hasn't been broke my entire life. Yeah, so I've been doing it sounds like anybody can do this. This is easy.

David:

I think I think people overcomplicate it sometimes but it really is as simple as, here's income, subtract expenses. This is more. Okay, like the very core.

05:00 - 10:00

Alex:

If you don't know personal finance, if you don't understand finance, income statements, balance sheets, cash statements or cash flows. If you don't understand the difference of these, if you don't know what the time value formula money is, then my personal suggestion is people go from, hey, I hate my job and I'm broke too. I'm gonna start real estate. I think that's, I think that's an error. Because real estate involves debt and risk. And if you're already mismanaging those two things, and why would adding more make you better?

So my personal recommendation is start with personal finance, get your house in order, and then go buy another house. So that's my personal opinion, that's my first recommendation. And look at people they really want to go fast, but they look at me like they think I go fast. I go really, unbelievably slow with things but that's why that's why things are so easy for me because I like huge groundwork for my endeavors.

David:

Well, and the other thing is like, like what you said, we've talked about risk of Ruin and barbell and all these other risk things on other episodes, but at the end of the day, if your finances are in, check, you can actually afford to take those risks that will net you, potentially more.

But if your finances are a shamble, nobody's gonna lend you on a really risky deal no one's gonna lend you on, you're gonna take this risk and if you fail what you will at some point, then, like now what you like you're totally screwed. So like, that's one of the things that's like my favorite thing I think about like being a young military like a guy who's in the military trying to invest is like I have had deals that didn't go well whatever but like, if I completely got just obliterated, like lost fucking everything on a deal I still have housing allowance, I still have food allowance, I still have a career I still have like I can I can fall back and my like, worst case like state of existence is still just normal middle class like so it's like if you have your finances in check, or you have a some kind of security like that you can afford to take a risk and not it won't destroy you. Whereas you know, if I I was broke and had no job and I was like, Fuck yeah, zero down, let's go, that that could potentially end very, very badly and put you in such a hole that like even mentally that you just don't recover from it.

Alex:

Military guys have a problem where they use what you use as a safety net, they used to stretch. And so it's like, hey, I get two grand a month, whatever it is, and I get three grand a month and stuff like spend three grand a month it's like no first spend nothing.

Then the $3,000 a month is your safety net for when you go off and you buy a $150,000 rental you know, but that's a very forward thinking thing. And that's something that I don't know when that happened. But thinking forward is so important. Like if you're in real estate, like every loan all the mortgages are 30 years like you better start thinking long term, bro, not five years. Third, like my mortgages are gonna pay off till I'm in my 50s.

David:

Yeah.

Alex:

Like I have to plan for that life now. I mean, it's hard but you have to think about it. You can't stop, you got to stop thinking about next weekend or this weekend Geez. Right, like if you're thinking about the next payday.

So that's what the time value of money is. Time value money is an incredibly simple formulation that I learned in finance school, everybody learns it in finance school, right? But it's like, it puts it on paper that there's math for you for the amount of years that are gonna go by. When you see it on paper, you're like, it just becomes real. You know, like, hang on a second, if I do this in 10 years, like, you know, I was just before that we started fussing. I was like, Look, I don't make that much money. A lot of that's my fault, because I don't take money for a lot of things. I'm just so charitable. Yeah, the other part of it is I lie in right like, and I'm bold, and humble. The other part of it is I lie, right? Like I do make decent money. I just never lived for one purpose. And also I see rich people. So I'm like, well, I better show up with my little nest egg that I'm doing fine. I just like the fuss.

David:

It's a mentality if you live poor as you're trying to grow and build and whatever. And you tell yourself, it's like, different people, different different strokes for different folks, right like I look in the mirror every day and I tell myself I'm a fat piece of shit. And then I go run, some people look in the mirror and they say, oh, you're making progress. That's just not how I communicate to myself. I look at my bank account and I say I'm a worthless sec, because I dumped all this cash into paying off debt or paying this or paying that and there's nothing in my actual bank account.

But that doesn't mean I don't have money, that just means I put it elsewhere and then I tell myself like your piece of shift works harder to make more money, like whatever, yeah.

Alex:

I need to get in my head the self loathing I live on.

David:

You let me make my hair go

Alex:

You know, stand a chance my friend.

David:

Got a few inches to grow.

Alex:

Hey, um, okay, let's let's, let's actually let me start because I was gonna come out of the gate with this. I wanted to say thank you.

David:

Oh, man, and I went in a totally different direction and brought the heat.

Alex:

Don't try to predict me bro. Ever out of the mistake. That is a mistake. Don't try to predict me bro.

10:00 - 15:00

David:

I was just trying to be unpredictable and I feel like I accomplished that.

Alex:

You can't out on predict me.

David:

This is gonna be like that worst podcast recording ever if we go crazy.

Alex:

No, it's the best. It's the best podcast recording. No, but I wanna say thank you. So, like, I don't know, I don't know what people think when they, you know, I know you have really dedicated listeners. And I hope that people have liked the addition of me coming on here. This is not something that you and I really planned. It was really impromptu and I do hope I'm adding value. I really do. I hope I'm adding value to you and the listeners but you know, I did a podcast and I hated it. And that's that was good for me to quit that podcast, but I'm really thankful that you let me do this one because well, it's easy. So if it turns into anything, this is low risk, high reward.

But it's no i like i like adding I like trying to add value. Obviously, you know, I wish my military experience had gone differently, certainly financially. And so any part of helping the next person not make my mistakes I like to be part of. And I was hanging out with you. And I thought you got sick of me far sooner than this. So I'm very grateful to be. I don't know, this is a really official, I really officially I'm not really officially the co host. It's just I'm always the co-host. I'm always the unofficial co-host. I like that better.

Anyways, so thank you very much. This has been a fantastic experience. I'm glad that I could be on episode 100 with you. So I just want to stop and say thanks.

David:

No, I appreciate it.

Alex:

And you're welcome.

David:

There we go. No, I appreciate it. And I've gotten a lot of really good feedback and no negative feedback. It seems that as predicted, we play off each other fairly well on the show with our I guess we're both high enough on the DNI scale that it makes for a good show, but no, but as far as..

Alex:

So how did you start the podcast? That's what I was. That's what I want to lean into.

David:

Okay, so honest story or no name drop like. So the honest story is that At some point in like, December of 2018, I had done a couple of YouTube videos. And I was talking to Brandon Turner at some point. And he was like, dude, just do a podcast. And I was like, and you know, I've already got all this other stuff going on. And he literally was just like, dude, you take the audio from the video you made with an interview, and you upload it. Tada podcast.

And then it was kind of like, Oh, well, I just got basically called out for being a lazy bum. Yeah, let's give it a shot. Dude, honestly, Brandon is like the reason everything that I have done exists. Like he was the catalyst to me starting a blog in the first place, and having an idea to write about, and then the catalyst for the podcast. Now obviously, there's been a whole lot of other things in there. But like that's a true testament to like two or three conversations with someone who's farther along in life can just directly change your life forever.

And it's not like I went up to Brandon, it was like, will you be my mentor? It was just like, Hey, man, I'm thinking about doing this like You know, and and like normal conversation and it just came up and it's like, well, what about this and that dude, if you've ever hung out with him, that guy's got ideas for days. He's like an Idea Factory.

Alex:

And Brandon got me started on YouTube. Not not completely, but partially when I saw that, I've hung out Brandon a few times now like briefly Dolly boys or anything.

And what did he say to me? He said, something just hit me like a ton of bricks. So simple he goes, and I don't think I think I've heard it before. But you know, sometimes you just need that person to say it again. And I was talking on YouTube. I was like, Brandon was just so scared of YouTube, but I feel like, I could be really good at YouTube. Because, you know,
yeah. So and he goes, uh, you just gotta do it, dude. Kinda like you say he's like, just do it. He goes, and he goes, you know, the key is to YouTube. He goes, you got to overreact about 15% of your body language. I said, Really? He goes, Yeah, you know, when you see me there, I'm excited. He goes in person. I look ridiculous. I'm really excited because it just looks good. And like, I know you've seen some of my videos where I've gone super hype on my YouTube and it's like Dude, in person I couldn't even do like it's but those kinds of things. Yeah Brandon, I'll just sit there and he'll just, he'll rattle off some of these little bits of wisdom and what's your point about mentors and what you said about people who are ahead of you, I call them close carrots. It's something I talk about all the time actually. A closed carrot, somebody you can see dangling in front of you, you know, you don't go chase Grant Cardone who has 6000 units. You chase somebody if you have five units. you chase somebody who has 20 you know, no, I'm close carrots. I've been fortunate to have a few. We Huffman Do you know him?

David:

Yeah.

Alex:

Who was my first real estate close carat. I had one property. He had five. He got me started blogging. He got me to fincon.

David:

And then we met.

15:00 - 20:00

Alex:

And then Mindy.

Mindy was a good early mentor for me. She uh I was I was on the BP forums just, you know, talking smack. And she reached out to me about five years ago out of the blue, and she's like, Hey, I'm the Community Manager here at BP. I just know you put a lot of advice in the forums, I just wanna say thanks for your participation.

And so Dude, I was like, Okay, let me feed that flame and school. And you know, what people underestimate about me is I play the ultra mega long game. And I do it discreetly. And I don't do it like I just mean like, I know that if I invest in people over the long run, it works out. So I said, Let me find this flame. And now, you know, five years later, she's the one that got me on the BP podcast. She's the one that introduced me everyday over there. In fact, yesterday she called me for some advice about how to deal with some drama on the forums. But you and I, as another like close carrot, right, I came to you. I was like, dude, I don't have a pot. He's got a podcast. He's got a YouTube, he's got a blog. He's got all this stuff. Let me just hang on this guy's mustache and see if I can rub off on me.

David:

Yeah, I just want to clarify real quick for those listening. When Alex says feed the flame, what do you get to think more of like, kind of like a cross between like a leech and Stockholm Syndrome? It's kind of like, you know, if I just hang out here long enough and bug the shit out of this dude, he's either gonna, like, kill me, or we're gonna be best friends.

Alex:

Stockholm Syndrome is exactly how I just described my style and I have for years heard similar, like, here's what here's what I do, right cuz I'm a very intense dude and in person. I think I'm worse. Like, I think on the podcast, I probably seem tame compared to I'm faster and..

David:

You and I both think that's normal.

Alex:

Yeah, you're nicer on the podcast, too. I mean, you see more in person, you're a lot and people are just more visceral, that comes off. If you have body language with it, right? I'm like, we're both very, I don't wanna say imposing but you know, the confidence comes through body language.

Plus, I'm, you know, really excited and I like to get And people's personal space and whatnot. And so, um, you know, it can be very, especially for introverts, right? Like, I deal well with introverts, but at first they're like, Whoa, this is a lot of pink hair and loud these cusses a lot. You talk shit, what the heck? You know, he can't be that good of a dude, it can't, right.

It's just it's too much right

David:

It’s very polarizing for sure.

Alex:

It's very polarizing, right? And then God forbid, you say something that, well, I'm always gonna just if you don't like people who disagree then or it's worse, right? Because I just so so people, generally people don't like it. First, I call myself an acquired taste. And then it's like, well, I know that I'm just gonna stick that I'm gonna stick that personality in your face for a long, long, long, long, long time to wear you down. And then finally you get the old oh, Alex, he's okay. He's just misunderstood.

That is Stockholm syndrome in a nutshell, bro.

David:

Oh, man. It's so true. But it's funny. And yeah, you know, and the other thing for me is like, like, I'm actually super extrovert, right? Like, if I'm the disc profile, I'm literally at 99. I, it does not go higher for like the people person to you, whatever. But I feed off people. So like, even, like if you ever were if someone like it would just be funny one day to just have like somebody just hire someone and just be like, alright, look, hey, I'm at this conference for three days. Just follow me. And just like I am literally like, bounce here, bounce there, bounce there, what's up, hey, who all over the place and I'll hit like 700 people. And then at the end of the day, I've got like a stack of business cards. It's bigger than my pocket and I'm like, ah, you know, but like, the podcast is great. It's wonderful. It's fun. It's just it's not always it depends on the guests. You know, that's why that's really the reason why I was looking at the idea of a co host and why it's been you is that whether the guest is because let's be honest, some guests are just lamer than others when it comes to like personality on record...

Alex:

It’s your guests. You can't talk smack about him. No, let me scratch that cut, don't listen to it.

Look, I know you're saying that right like a human..

David:

Energy level, you know some people you click..

Alex:

And they're strangers it takes sometimes for people to warm up. Right? It's awkward. Some not everybody's very not every experience on podcasts, not everybody, sometimes the people doing their first podcast.

David:

Yeah. Yeah, it's nothing against that. You know what I meant? They've all been wonderful. But it's been good to have another energy source that no matter what can help bring out the hype or the energy, and it's actually funny. So you mentioned Brandon was the one who told you about being a little extra on. So I sat one day and asked him when he was in Hawaii. At one point, I was like, Hey, can I just sit off to the side while you do a webinar? Like I want to learn how to do a webinar? Can I just sit over here like come over and just hang out and just watch what you do? And dude, it was literally like, five minutes before the webinar starts you'd like to make a cup of coffee and he's still chill branded, and it was lovely. like three to one. And it was like a completely different person for like 45 minutes and then afterwards it's like, okay, who that was it was like I mean light switch. And that stuck for me too. In fact I need to do a better job of it on camera but it's so true. You gotta you got to overhype when you're going to be recording.

20:00 - 25:00

Alex:

Greg Carroll and I went to a Grant Cardone seminar years ago before he did real estate. I was following him because he did do car sales. I was in car sales. So before the real estate thing, I was a big Grant Cardone fan. I'm actually less of a fan of him now these days, but I would do a seminar with him right and he's super hype and then he are and then he says on stage, like somebody came back to me saw me backstage before we started and I was like, chillin, I was mellow and they're like, how can we not energy's like, a tough time. You know, I do that sounds fake. That's all I'm saying. So, um, and I do the same thing, right? Like, I don't wear this pink t-shirt. And you know, it's like I'm chilling in the house. I'm calm when we got on before. Like where the show is, you know, you and I are a lot more mellow. So I think there's just a partially natural tendency for people to act. And then part of it is a learned behavior. It's like, hey, look, I gotta step this up because it's not gonna trick my body language and is not gonna translate through audio. So I gotta like, Hey, I gotta amp it up. You know,

David:

I think it's much less of a natural behavior. Think back to when you first started recording yourself. It didn't feel natural to be overhyped, if anything you were underhyped it's always weird when you first start. I think it's definitely learned. You have to get comfortable on camera before you can really try to turn it up to 11 as they say.

Alex:

Speaking of extra I'm the same as you. I score off the charts on extrovert charts on extrovert measurements. Like not 90, 100% always there's no and I have this argument with a just brilliant Katie here about these tele typing personality tests. I think everybody I think everybody should, should take those all, what's your four or five of them? There's a disc, which I've never done. There's anagram. There's Myers Briggs, and there's the Big Five. I think everybody should take them. And then I think you should, you know, know that they're mostly nonsense, but they are, they have usefulness in them. It's good to know, like, if you're sitting there and you're trying to produce content, and you don't know if you're extroverted introvert or if you need to go to conferences or read these things, it's good to know, it's good to know how you scale in terms of you know, these personality type tests. I couldn't you know, introverts have a hard time with content a lot of times and they and and, and but it's also good to know because you can get over it Brandon Turner is an introvert.

David:

Yes.

Alex:

Jay Scott is an introvert, high introverts.

So it's good to know like, you can get past it but you should know where you're at. Don't try to force it. You know, like, if it's not your..

David:

I mean, there's, you know, you can you can start off with a blog and social media stuff or you don't have to be the face or the voice behind the camera or whatever like, because even for me being as extroverted as I am, it took time and it took practice. It's not even still, like, I have Airbnb guests in the house, you know, from time to time and when they're home, and I have told myself, I have to record a video. I have a hard time turning it up that extra 15% because I'm like, God, someone in the house is gonna hear me like, screaming at my camera, like and I and I notice it like I can tell when I'm doing it. But I'll notice and I'll be like, Oh, I either shouldn't record right now or I just have to be okay with the fact that I'm going to be really awkward for a little bit.

So I just let people know. I'm like, hey, by the way, I have a podcast if you hear me screaming at my camera. It's totally normal. And then that makes me feel a little bit better. But yeah, I look forward to when I have a studio and I can just like, you know, I don't know, yell at my camera and be hyping jump and bounce and whatever. And like it's you know me dance in my room in my pajamas type thing, what eats around. Nobody cares.

Alex:

Dude creating content is one of the best things I ever did. I don't do nearly as well as you as you do, but I'm not structured and I don't have a strategy. And as you do, but I, for me, it's been a two year well, coming up on three years, coming up on three years, two and a half years. It's been writing, podcasting and then now video and it's mostly practice, like just getting it myself comfortable doing it before I like actually now I'm just now starting to be a little more strategic where, you know, I did those videos for bigger pockets which came out this week.

David:

Yeah.

Alex:

They, uh, I don't know, they're okay. They're okay. But they're good, but go watch him and subscribe to my YouTube channel. Thank You shameless plug.

Um, but uh, you know, like, dude, if you're, if you're listening to this, which you are.

David:

I catch myself saying that sometimes.

25:00 - 30:00

Alex:

I check, If you're listening to this anyway, produce content, whatever it is if you're introverted, right, if you're extroverted, you know, do video. I mean, those aren't really, that's not really like how it works because but maybe that's like an easier way in but whatever it is like, dude, you got to get, you'll get used to it, you'll get used to it.

And the sky's the limit for content, but the ceiling for not producing content is incredibly low. Like you just can't get that far in this new age, especially, you know, dude, it was inevitable, but COVID sped it up like the Internet is a necessary for all for all success now. And so people have to know you, they have to see your face. They have to.

David:

Yeah, if you're doing anything, especially with investors, and you don't have a website, like pause this and go build some kind of like, the first thing that anybody who's ever gonna think about handing you cash is going to do it's not your mom is going to go look at your website, and if it doesn't exist, you're not getting that investors money. So even from just a business like private money standpoint, like, gotta have something does not have it.

Alex:

Yeah, my first website, like I spent 60 bucks on WordPress I designed, it was just a block of text, it was nothing. There's no pictures, because I didn't know how to put my photography up there yet really. There were no menus, there were no pictures, there was no nothing. It was just a block of text. Sometimes I go to the Wayback Machine on the internet, you can check old websites and look at my website from 2017. And it was just, it was just a block of text. It was nothing.

David:

I should go and check it out.

Alex:

You should go check it out. And then I said, I'm going to fincon. And it was like, just like you said, David's like, Hey, I'm going to these people are gonna ask me what my website is. And I don't want to be that embarrassed. I'll be a little embarrassed, but I don't wanna be a little bear. So that was the part that David Thompson I love Paul.

David:

That’s a smart dude.

Alex:

He goes, let me subscribe to your email list. And I was like, I don't I don't do that. And he's like, what the heck rookie? And I was like, okay, so I had a website, but then it helped me you know, like cross that next the next threshold you start a website dude and then meet other content creators and and you know it's a it's a get better over time thing it does have the perfect budget to get started yet to get comfortable putting yourself out there or don't and let me David run rampant over the competition.

David:

All right here we go October 18 2018 two snapshots, I am going to as soon as I pull it as soon as it loads we're going to see what my crappy website looked like before I use your recommended web design guy.

Alex:

Yeah, I want to use my guy again to redesign my website and renamed my website but he's gotten so good. He's expensive now.

David:

Yeah? He's good

Alex:

He is good.

I mean, he's not, he's not, he's not super I'm poor.

I'm poor. All right. So while you're pulling yours, I'm gonna put my up and then we'll show people. Yeah, it will show Um.

What else while we're talking, what else? Let's see that um, hey, I want to rename my website. Actually, let's talk about this right? Um, you can talk to us right live whenever you're listening. Well, it's not live but.

I think I'm gonna change the website my web name

David:

And. I am there we go. Can you see it?

Alex:

Yep, dude, ugly but it work

David:

As plain as fucking possible man. Let's see what the start here page looks like.

Oh it was just funny.

Alex:

I can’t find mine. How come?

David:

And you're right it worked. That's that's all that matters.

Alex:

Yep yeah like you got started like nobody cares about your I can't see I can't see David.

David:

Yeah, it's a slow loading website.

Alex:

But yeah, nobody cares about your old site that when you started and it was garbage, nobody cares, nobody cares. Then I look at it.

David:

And I didn't even start blogging as like, oh man, I'm gonna build a business. It was like, I'm just gonna document what I'm doing because someone told me I should start a blog and I respected their opinion. So fuck it.

And to think that less than three years later, it's morphed into the ability for me to leave the military. Well go reserves, but you know, the ability to have that option and that freedom in my life is not just the website, obviously, real estate played a very large portion in that as well. But I've had opportunities come up from real estate that I wouldn't have had without the platform, so like, it's just been a very mutually beneficial thing to do.

30:00 - 35:00

Alex:

Dude, it compounds that people in ways people don't know so like, if you're thinking about it, it's like start it write a blog, write what you think because you know what, if anything else, and I I, I find myself in a weird place with my peers, people like you and others that measure success on metrics. And I don't do that so much, really, to my own fault lines. But to give people another perspective, the way I grow is very rarely by metrics. And it's usually by documenting what I'm scared of. And so how do I say this, like, I know, I truly believe that deep down, confidence is the key to all success, your ability to believe in yourself and your ideas. And then then you can sell them to other people, and then they manifest into reality. So it starts with self confidence, what you think you can achieve, and then the confidence to go out and do it.

And so all I ever worry about is what I'm not confident in and then, and then putting myself in uncomfortable positions. That's why I talk about insecurity all the time. Like I'm not that insecure about things and a lot of people are insecure about me. I'm actually quite confident about most of the things but I'm always putting myself in insecure positions of things that are way outside my comfort zone. And so when you put that content out there, if you're scared to go ahead, talk shit.

David:

I was gonna ask what you are insecure about.

Alex:

I'm insecure about a lot of things.

That's another podcast, I’m insecure about a lot of things.

David:

They change as you grow though.

Alex:

But that's my point, it should change as you grow. It's your comfort zone is a circle and you live inside it. Right? Life is easy and unfulfilling. And so the idea is to always be on the outside of that circle, and then it grows. And so like most people may be confident, like, you know, right here, and then they don't talk about insecurity.

My confidence dude is like this, but I'm on the outside of that circle. And that's all I ever talked about. And so I say all that to say, I don't know what content creation will do for you monetarily. But I know that if you're afraid of it, then you fucking need to do it today.

Because it will grow that confidence. And let me tell you something else. The barrier to impressing other people is low. Right? They go to my website like this guy's legit. I'm like, is it am I I paid somebody to do my website and I put my authentic authentic self on that website right that's good. That's one thing I'm really good at. I'm very transparent and really authentic.

And so I don't do it to make money but it does make me some money because people see it and like this guy's the real deal. Okay with that said, let me show you my screen ready? I'll show you my Wayback Machine this. This is from like 2017.

David:

All right before we even met before you met me see it.

Alex:

Before we even meet, you see it?

David:

Hell yeah!

Alex:

I'm into Las Vegas. No, no, give me a good move. It's been far better than I thought.

So June 12. Look, do you see this? Who would read this?

David:

It’s a block of text.

Alex:

This is a block of text. That's one block. Here's another one. You must love the process May 15. This blood makes your underwriting easy May 1st, 2018 so not that long ago.

David:

No.

No, it doesn't. Right around when I was starting up. We started fairly at the same time. You probably had a six month jump on me.

Alex:

Yeah, you've done a lot better but you also try a lot harder at things than me.

Well, look, you know, I help people If you're listening to this on audio, you know, you're kind of we're kind of leaving you on alert right now. But if you can scoot over to us..

David:

I mean, I can describe both of our websites are basically a gray background with a lot of fucking words running all over the place.

Alex:

Like dude no, the point of that. Nobody, nobody would read that. No. So that's not the point. The point is that it helped me grow. Right? Because let me tell you a story real quick. Like, I was so insecure about putting stuff on the internet because oh my god, what if somebody doesn't like it? Right?

That's a that is a 100% incorrect assumption. That's not really what's going on. And so I said, Okay, I'm gonna suck it up, and I'm pulling the internet. And instantly, I realized that I was wrong. I was not insecure. I was arrogant to think that I could put something on the internet and then anybody would even bother to care who, right? You think you're going to put something on it? Make your little website and then it's going to impact the world in any way? That's not insecurity, my friend that's arrogance. Right? You need to work it like very diligently strategically and over time to make an impact on the internet. There's a million blog posts at every moment. And so that really helped me realize that what I thought was insecurity was narcissism. And it's actually, it's actually easier to overcome, to become a little more humble about things than it is to be overcoming security. And so how I framed that was just like, Oh, now I can put stuff out there because nobody's even reading it. So there's like, no, there's no, there's nothing on the line. And then when I'm finally good, if I'm finally good, then people will perk up and notice, and so there's no downside to producing content, because it's bad. No one will care. And if it's good, they'll love you.

David:

That's true. I mean, my first few videos on YouTube have, you know, like, no views, so, you know, whatever, like, Who cares? And they were pretty bad. And then they continue to be bad and they, they, you know, whatever, they're still not great, but you know, they work and they get a lot more views. And ultimately, if people like your content, it'll come back around, you know, like, like the video the articles and stuff that I've posted that, you know, whatever they didn't do well, nobody knows they exist unless they go digging around in my blog.

But the articles and stuff that I have put produced that did go well, like, people can find me on Google through them. You know, I mean, it's it. Yeah, the good stuff. Well, it's almost like Google's your best friend because it'll help you weed out the shit you don't want people to see anyway.

35:00 - 40:00

Alex:

Yes, yeah. So if you're on the fence about producing content, like, dude, me and David, both, as you just said, started two years ago, not knowing what we're doing. We still don't end yet you're listening to this podcast, so it works.

David:

True, true. I like that.

Alright, so what's so what's next?

I don't even know where to go with this question. Because I don't know either of us. Both of us are at a point in our life from talking to you that I think you're similar where it's like, it's a fluid future. Like there's things that I don't know for me. I'm like, I have ideas of things that I want to accomplish but I'm not really worried about how I'm worried about like alright cool well why do I want the freedom to have more time? Why do I want the ability to have a studio where I know I do not have to work out of my house. I could spend time with my family and whatever but like the how is not not really what I'm worried about right now.

So when I think about like the plan it's it's less of a plan and more of a vision at this point and it's it's crazy because I the transition from going to I need to plan fucking everything and hope it works and I do a journal I go like I plan I do, I plan like my most important next steps, but like as far as figuring out how I'm going to go from still in the Marine Corps to owning a studio and having my own office in Missouri, like the plan is literally just been, I'm going to look for some properties and I have an idea what I want to look for and and and the crazy thing is that since I've made that shift, things that started happening, like in December, I wrote down that I wanted to host or help with one of the veteran events It happened.

And then I wrote down that I wanted to be able to run x speed by x time and it happened faster. And I wrote down that I wanted to do this and it happened. I wrote down that I wanted to make this much money and even right now, like my quote, monetary goal is like a passive income number. And there's literally no plan to get there. And I can't even like there is no like, Oh, yeah, I know how I'm gonna do this. It's like, Ah, that's a cool number. That'll allow me to leave the military. And like, how are you gonna get there? Fucking no, like, I don't know, it's just become more of a vision thing. And it's, anyway, so I was gonna ask what's next for you? But the reality is that if someone asked me that I wouldn't be able to answer. So, I don’t know.

Alex:

Yeah, I'm in a tough spot right now because I moved back here to Fayetteville and the businesses. It's good for me to be here, but I hate living here.

And, you know, I quit my job. And so I'm kind of like, I have too much free time to solve hard problems. I know that sounds fucked up, but going to work every day and not have enough money. That's an easy problem to solve. Because money's easy to make. I mean, take you two, three years, but then you know, then you have enough, then you can quit your job. But then what do you do with all your free time? That's a much harder problem to solve.

And so now I'm trying to create, and I'm kind of like real estate's on cruise control, right? I'm going to flip probably eight houses this year, my first year, trying to write an ad will make like 25 grand a pop. I mean, that's, I mean, that's good. You know, that's not so bad. Plus the passive income, I'd like to buy another multifamily. But again, it's one of those things where it's like, okay, just go find, just go find, get my partner to look for deals, and then we'll just buy one, right. I have investors now that I think can fund it. I mean, not to say it won't be challenging, but it's not like it's like, I don't, I'm kind of getting wrapped up and..

David:

You do need a bigger challenge.

Alex:

Well, so I'm trying to lean into this creative side. That's a much harder challenge for me, right? And it's much harder to quantify, hey, I need X amount of dollars. It's like a month. It's a well then just go by this amount of deals. Right? It's like it's kind of easy. But you know, now I'm thinking like, how can I stretch my creative talents? Like, I want to make a short film.

How do you do that? That's harder, in my opinion. Like for a guy like me, it's like okay, what do you well what story you're gonna tell?

David:

Yeah, suck at the story part.

Alex:

Dude. But to me it's that's the next challenge right cuz Real Estate's like again, it's like it's on cruise control. I bought the houses, I flipped the houses, we have enough rentals. I'm gonna go buy another multifamily, but again, it's like, dude, you find the deal. You close the deal. You've let you manage it, but then, like, it's just not it's an ego thing, right? It's like how many numbers how many doors can you get? Right? Okay, fine. Oh, you have 10,000 doors. Okay, now what do you do all the time? You're gonna die soon? What are you gonna do the rest of your time?

David:

Soon, I like that. That's a good word.

40:00 - 45:00

Alex:

Well, I say that. I say it all the time. So I've been writing down some very abstract ideas like travel, I want to travel to a bunch of places. You know, and I'm looking up like there's famous places in history. I'm a big history buff. If you don't know this, if anybody doesn't know about me, I'm a huge history guy. So there's a lot of places in Europe I'd like to go and I'd like to go to the east, but I'm scared to go to China and stuff a little bit. So I need some friends to do that. So if you want to travel to Europe..

David:

Dude you let me know.

Alex:

Also. So I've been making lists like..

David:

We can start a travel blog.

Alex:

I'm gonna start a travel blog. So here's check this out. Here's this idea. This is my next big, but a very audacious, wacky kind of materialistic idea. I've been dying for a Porsche my whole life.

They're incredibly expensive. And, and the worst part, but of course, is if you get an older one, they get more expensive.

David:

Yeah.

Alex:

So like buying like a 1993, 911 would cost me like 120 grand for a nice turbo.

So I'd like to buy a Porsche and I'd like to take a picture of it in all 50 states, all 48, Call 48.

So those are the kinds of things that I've been thinking about what's next. It's like, you know, the money's gonna come. I have enough now, maybe not a super lot, but I'd like to do more event photography when events open up.

David:

So stay tuned to the next YouTube channel, Dave and Alex get drunk in random places.

Alex:

I'm down for that. I'm down for that.

David:

I had all kinds of travel, travel travel goals for the world. So yeah.

Alex:

Yeah. Let's travel. I'm down for that.

And I got we both have nice cameras. We can tell some good stories.

David:

And just one of us knows how to use it.

I knew it was coming! I knew it was coming!

For the record. All right.

Alex:

Your good co-host.

David:

Alex and I don't get along at all.

Just let me agree to bring my 100th episode. Bring on someone on the show to just talk shit at me now. That'd be cool.

And I'm you know what's great about having a camera like this? I don't have to know how to use it. It fucking does everything for me now I know that there's a ton of stuff that I could do to improve but I mean, this camera has been such a blessing for me just the autofocus alone for being able to actually like leave my house and film stuff outside like that has just completely changed because before I mean, you saw what I had to do to get my stupid camera to focus it was not it's not ideal. If I took it off it was a pain in the ass to get it set up again to do videos at my house. Now I've got two tripods, three locations in the house and I can just fucking like drag it to the beach, drag it outside of the park, drag it whatever.

Alex:

Hey, let me ask you on that note. I've been doing photography for a while now. I'm pretty good at it.

David:

Yeah.

Alex:

I want to ask you but I'm asking your guests to note that I doubt that they know me as well as they know you but my website called brokerschoice.com and start There's a place for me to talk about personal finance and real estate. And then I don't talk about personal finance hardly at all anymore, basically put my deals on there. And then I put adventures and my mindset stuff on the website. And it's become more about a, it's been, it's become more about lifestyle than it is. And my real estate deals for sure, but more about that lifestyle than it is about. I do a lot of book content.

And I think I want to change the name from brokers of choice. And I was going to start a second website just for the pictures, whatnot, but I thought that was too much work. And it's not like I monetize a website. So I pretty much changed my website name from brokers of choice to life as a choice and then putting a lot more creative content on there without having to be like a woman to alienate my super limited anyway, user base. And then to take that one step further. I was thinking of making my YouTube a lot more creative, like I showed you a little downtime video, and I was thinking of doing photography type content, like hey, you want to buy a DSLR here's what here's here's because I know some stuff now. Right? I've been through three For my my second full frame camera but to my third and you know I know the lenses I know the technical aspects of how those cameras work and so I think by doing that stuff so think about your thoughts ,what should I do should I keep them separate? Or should I just integrate them, it's me call it me change website name a little bit to be a little more encompassing because I'll tell you what, given the brokers a choice website name to creatives, not a good fit. They don't like that. It's not as punchy finance people real estate people they like it.

David:

I would say I like it but that makes sense if you're going to try to do anything with a brand or creative or whatever. Yeah. I know I really do like the name of your channel but or your blog, but that is definitely an understandable thought process.

Life is a choice and it's pretty catchy too. I mean, it's not quite as asshole as broke as a choice, which I think is why I like it because it fits your demeanor, your persona.

45:00 - 50:00

Alex:

I can keep the URL and use it like Yeah, I could keep the URL and like you know, hey get business cards if I go to a finance conference hand that out if I go to another place I can handle the business cards the other one and kind of I can do it that way it'll still be like there's a choice but to have like a landing page and I could just be like, hey, look at the name here's why but you know, I'm still like that me.

David:

I like that, I think you could probably do very well with the channel talking content and talking about like cameras and stuff. I've got a friend Chris winter who has like a half a million subscribers on YouTube and he does right that channel he started doing just like reviews on cameras and stuff.

I think the really cool benefit is that you're good with the camera because you have the personality and some of those guys are like a lot of that stuff. Like when I first started getting into this, that was where I learned some basic stuff like there's a few channels I follow for advice on that.

Some of those guys are very monotone and the ones who do very well are great with a camera but they have the personality so you I think you can break into that niche. The really cool benefit for you if that's something you're looking to do is going to be that as that grows companies are going to send you gear to review companies are going to say like I know that's not why you're looking at getting into it but like can you imagine as a photographer who started as a hobbyist and is now a business or whatever, you're getting sent a $2,000 lens to you know, review or whatever like that's not far fetched. And that's cool.

Alex:

Yeah, I’ve been looking at that canon rF 85 1.2 oh my god.

David:

Like three grand right, that's the one it's like, 2900?

Alex:

Yeah but it might be worth it, bro. I'm gonna if I go to the next conference, I go, I'm gonna buy one for sure and bring it but yeah, yeah, so I could do some gear but I'm just curious, your initial thoughts about should I keep those separate? Or should I just say it doesn't matter. I'll do my real estate stuff on my YouTube and I'll do you know, some photography review stuff, who cares? And the website will be the same thing and it'll just be me.

David:

I think if you mean, it could go either way. I have started to look at things like the business funds the real estate and the real estate is a big piece of it. And so I try to talk about everything and I've just slowly morphed over time.

I think if you keep it all as you and you focus more as like, it's a personal brand. So like, at the end of the day, the military millionaire community focuses on you know, real estate, entrepreneurship, personal finance, but like you, my personal finance videos are minimal. But what I've started to realize is I need to do more like military contents, like I'm working on a video right now that's like, pros and cons of becoming a marine or something like that, because I saw that there's three channels that have less subscribers than I do that all have videos over 50,000 to 100,000 views, one of them has the same amount of subscribers I do in like 140,000 views on a video like that.

So I'm like, okay, that's a con. That's a topic that I need to do a video about, because it'll bring more people into the fold, or what I've realized is, yes, I'm about this niche. But if I can't figure out how to get in front of people who don't already know that they need this niche, then I'm never going to help them. People so how do I do that? Well, I do more military specific content, which is not necessarily what started. But I'm still I'm like, I just never clicked like, yeah, so I'm a quote expert in like military real estate investing or entrepreneurship or whatever, like people view come to listen to me talk about stuff like that and help them out.

I've also been doing the Marine Corps longer than all of that shit. So if anything, I'm more than qualified to talk about the military in general and I don't do it enough. So I think the fact that you've spent years building up the ability to talk about cameras and creativeness, I think that absolutely can just mold in. I don't see any reason why you have to segregate those things. I like they're they're mutually beneficial. I mean, I literally real estate photography is a niche. So I mean, you could easily combine those things. I think.

Alex:

That's how I started in photography.

David:

Yeah.

Alex:

I went off and I found a real estate photographer to teach me so I can take pictures of my own real estate and then I was like, Hey, you know what I found out real quick that I hate real estate photography as a niche.

David:

Interesting.

Alex:

Um, yeah, well in photography that's like it's like real estate right? Like just because you do real estate. What kind?

David:

Yeah.

Alex:

What kind? Well, photography is the same way do you shoot portraits? Do you shoot events? Do you shoot sports? Do you shoot, you know, I mean high school sports, do you shoot pageants, do you shoot weddings, do you like, I do lifestyle type photography where I tell stories.

And then other people do all sorts of different stuff I hate and then real estate photography, architectural photography, product photography, there's all sorts of stuff. And so yeah, I, I those they do overlap a lot for me. So I'm just kind of feeling it out. I really don't want to run two sites. I don't even do much on my own site.

David:

Yeah, keep it simple.

Alex:

Yeah, but I need to change the name. So if you hear this before I change the name, which is probably correct and you want to give me some advice. Listeners, please. I need all the help I can get. Or if you think this is a good or a bad idea, tell me if you think It's a bad idea. Tell me if you think it is a good idea. Just let me go. I already know.

50:00 - 55:00

David:

Oh man. All right, so let's see, give another good question or two and then we'll kind of roll into our normal closers. Because as much as you and I can literally talk for hours, nobody's gonna listen to our two or three of us rambling, so.

Alex:

Not you, me.

David:

Alright, so trying to think of, I had a good one there for a second.

Alex:

Let's talk about um, I got one. So the way I was gonna preface it with the way you and I met and how, besides content besides real estate, such personal finance, whatever your hobbies are, like, in my opinion, the 100% best investment by a longshot is people easily, easily. I haven't..

David:

Even schmucks like me.

Alex:

Even schmucks like David.

I have. I have an excessive amount of content on my website about this, like people are the best investment and it's amazing how they compound how the relationships compound and so I talked about what we have... helped me with my, my first place. He helped me start my website. He helped me go to fin con. At fin con I met this mustachioed idiot looks.

Yeah, I was I won't I won't name names. Um, and now you fast forward that for two years and now we're here and God knows what's gonna happen in 10 years. Right? Yeah, I mean I have that I have that blackmail picture of you. But I have a few of them actually. That Uh, no, not that one. The puke one.

David:

Oh no.

Alex:

Yeah, I just don't know. God forbid you get successful.

David:

Yeah, people like you, friends like you were the reason I'm never gonna run for public office is yeah, you know, you hear about all these skeletons getting dragged out of the office or out of the closet. Mine aren't in the closet, like easy to find.

Alex:

Um, so.

David:

It was a great night, I don't know what that morning wasn't so great, but that night was great.

Don't try to hang with Alex. Don't don't yeah.

Alex:

that's, that's a mistake.

David:

Don't do it. I don't know how.

Alex:

You should try but just be ready to be embarrassed.

And I'll get up earlier than you and go mingle, mingle, too.

I met a was it when I was at BP con that I met Julian Sage. I liked Julian, but we had a really awkward interaction then. He irks me in some, some certain little ways, but good dude. But we met and I was just hung over and cranky. And I was just being self deprecating. I was like, whatever.

But I was up. I was drunk and I was up.

David:

I'm like me, who was drunk and playing and yeah, anyway.

Alex:

But people had so if you're an introvert, like this is why I started my web, my video chats my website like introverts you know, the the small investment in people we talked about Stockholm Syndrome earlier, like the small investment of people, the genuine and continuous fanning those flames those relationships, man, they really just I can't I mean, I didn't think that this would ever happen, you know us doing this podcast 100 episodes now.

And I don't know what's happening next but you know, it wasn't if it wasn't for people like you and Spencer, I would have done my YouTube which is nothing but it's gonna turn into something for sure. Without people like Mindy I wouldn't have done it. I wouldn't be able to get on the bigger pockets podcast with really, you know, jumping forward, meeting Zack at BiggerPockets conference. I mean, the list goes, I don't want to. I hate saying lists of people because it's like, oh, god, there's inevitably a million people who forget.

And so it's like a two fold thing but fanning the flame those relationships and then making sure you're always finding new ones. And I do conferences because I love conferences. But if you're an introvert, like do it online BP pipe forums are perfect. But um, yeah, I just wanted to, if you have any good stories about like people that you had new ideas like we did, Josh Josh Elledge? Yeah. And I met him at fin con. I was holding my camera and he said what kind of cameras and I was told I had the new R, I just got it. And, um, you know, we talked about cameras, but I had no idea that he was like a super mega star. And, you know, now we're, I don't wanna say we're buddies, but you know, he knows me. Yeah.

55:00 - 1:00:00

David:

A little connection goes a long way. I think. So. So Doug Nordmann is like the first person I ever met who is like, legitimately like, Oh shit, he is the connector, like this guy.

I remember going to the military influencer conference. So the first year I was at fin con it piggybacked and I went directly after or right before that two military influencer conference because he told me I should go to both if I'm going to one and I remember by like, day two, it was like, I'm gonna stop introducing myself as Dave and just say, like, I'm here with Doug. Like, everybody knows, Doug, you know, it was just crazy.

But I think the more that I grow and build this platform, like the networking piece like that, it's becoming the most valuable, like, quote, superpower that I have, like being able to connect people with other people. And, and build relationships is, I mean, that's a huge, huge gift, because it's all about people. And so to have a network where you can reach out to somebody everywhere, and be able to solve problems is just, it's cool.

Alex:

Yeah, and people want to help every dollar you're ever going to look, there's no currency in nature. It's man made, every dollar you're ever going to make is going to come from another human being, someone's gonna write you a check.

And so again, back to our goal setting, it's like I don't have goals. I have how many people I say, I just need to invest in people that I think well first, you gotta get to know who's a good investment. That's part of.

David:

How do you wait it out?

Alex:

I don't know. That's good. That's a really good question.

David:

You know what I do?

Alex:

No.

David:

This has been, this has been my most recent thing. So because I can't keep up with everybody that at this sound like I'm an asshole, I can't keep up with the people who reach out, like without a calendar app, right? Like, I just I've gotten so busy. And mainly because the Marine Corps still eats nine hours a day that I don't have a cell phone, so there's only so many hours.

And so I have to use this app. And I'll tell you this, because I was gonna make a rant about it today because it happened again today. For the last three weeks, I've had every seven in the morning slot full with somebody for an introduction call. And at least 35% of those don't call probably half and it says very clearly, like you must call me like I'm not because if somebody really wants to connect, like, they'll pick up the phone or they'll call you at the time that they scheduled.

So the first thing that I do to weed someone out right now is you schedule a call with me. You don't tell me that you're not going to call, then you just burn that bridge. Like you're gonna have to work twice as hard to convince me to reschedule not because I don't want to talk to you. But because you clearly didn't value my time enough for this to be a mutually beneficial relationship.

Alex:

That's, that's a specific one. But I think the idea is sound right? Like, this is something that people don't say out loud enough, but nobody is going to care more about you than you.

And so if you need to reach out to David to get ahead, and you don't care enough to do it, David's not going to care enough. David. David already knows David David doesn't have to connect with David.

David:

True

Alex:

Like you. So that's a good one. Right? I always make sure that's a very good one. I couldn't see now that we're flushing out that, like, I look for people's actions. Right. And I say, do they? '' Do they care about themselves more than they care about? See what I'm really good at is separating talk from action. I can just have a gift of watching what people do and ignoring everything they say.

David:

Another really good one that ties in with that is exactly that. If you come to me and ask for advice on something, and I give you like three different ideas, and, and you don't do them, but you do something else, okay. But if I give you advice on like three different ideas, and you do one of them great. If I give you three different ideas, though, and you don't do anything, and then you still have the same problem in a month. Like, we're done, like you're not so like, and I say that like I'm an asshole, but I have had a few the privilege of a few good coaches or, or just I say coaches, I say mentors, but like just friends, just people who invested in me, like I tried to invest in others. And at one point, I remember asking a friend, like a mentor of mine, like Dude, how is it that like, you know, I forget how the conversation came up. But this guy basically told me like, you know, the reason that you guys still talk, right and the reason you help, and I was like, no, yeah, totally clueless is what he's good at. And he was someone much smarter than me. And he basically was like, the reason that person still helps you with things is because when he gave when you asked for advice, and he gave you something, you did it.

And like that's the piece people will ask you for advice all day and you see it like, the more you talk to people, the more you see, the people come to you, they ask for advice. They pick your brain, which I hate that phrase, because it's like, Yeah, sure. Here's some free 99 like of my time, you know, like, I get it. But it's it's a frustrating phrase, because the idea is just like, Oh, sure, here you go, just please just just pick away at my brain for hours, but they come and they pick your brain and they want this advice, and they want this than the other and then you give it to them. They do fucking nothing with it. And then they want to schedule another call because they're still stuck. And it's like, no, that's not like, I want to help you. But at some point if you're not willing to help yourself. I have other people that will take my advice and will try to act like you don't have to succeed at it. You don't have to take my advice, but if you don't do anything, then why why do I want to jump on another call and take more time to talk to you.

1:00:00 - 1:05:00

Alex:

People love their handheld. But if you asked me a question I didn't have any I didn't say I don't know. But actually I've written about this.

So I wrote an early article on BP about finding mentors, I've written a few actually. And to your point, I think they're the common advice. If you want to find a mentor, find a way to trade value. And I think that's an incredibly small part of it, actually, to be honest, I know that's the overwhelmingly common advice, like you want to find a mentor, it's like, find somebody to give them value.

You know, if you can, that's great. But there's a lot of times, you know, and I know that you help people that don't, they have no value to bring you. You're just helping, and that's, and so why does that happen? Right? Nobody ever talks about that. That's overwhelmingly what happens, people help with no trade of value at all. And so How come nobody says that? And so what I think it really comes down to is people want to invest.

Look, everyone here is an investor. So I want to make good investments. Well, people are the best investment. So how do I determine who's a good investment. And so just like you said, first show up and show up a lot. This is what it's like when you go to meetups, like this is part of it, right? It's not going to the meetup. It's going every month. So people get used to your face like that guy is committed. That guy, he's a staple, he's not going anywhere. That's a good like, go to conferences, go to meetups, go to virtual events, show up in groups, post on VP forums, post post, but like, show up, be there. Like, that's part of it, okay, he's not going around, he's not going away. So I might as well participate with him. But if I think you're gonna be gone in a month, you know, just go in a day.

So part of it is showing up being repeated. Secondly, is, um, you know, I want to make sure that I want to see that you're improving more than I want to see that you care more than anybody else.

David:

Yup.

Alex:

And then the last one, and I'm just spitballing here is like, dude, I'm looking at your trajectory. And if I think you're gonna make it, like everybody, rockstars be around us and hang out with rock stars. So, some of us get a feel for somebody right? Or how about this? Are you saying that he talked about the past like little stuff, right? What are you working on reading books? Or are you? Whatever.

David:

Did you fail because of someone else? Or did you fail because you didn't learn something?

Alex:

Self responsibility. I'm big on like, there's certain keys too, so I get it's just it's not much more than maturity honestly. But it's a timeline right? Cuz everybody's gonna mature. The key is to do it faster than your peers. You want to be 30 at 25 you want to be 40 at 30 right? Like, that's the key.

David:

How old am I? Am I 40?

Alex:

You're like 21. You're a fucking idiot.

David:

Goddamn. That’s the other way around. I was, so, there we go. 40-30 baby.

Alex:

Yeah, I have the wisdom of a 50 year old and the looks of a 27 year old dude. I am like..

David:

I'm probably the other way around.

Alex:

No, no.

David:

Me. I'm the other way around, Oh, yeah, I got the looks of a 40 year old and the maturity of the affected marine.

Alex:

If I were good if I'm here to pick up your Slack.

David:

I appreciate it.

Alex:

So like there's this guy in Las Vegas. Gary Crawford, as soon as I met this guy, he was 25 or 26. As soon as I met this guy, I'm like, this dude's a rockstar. He's killing it. I could just feel it. He was oozing off of them. And I invested a lot in this guy. And, you know, he's had he's had his troubles along the way. And he's got his ass kicked a little bit by life, because life full life can do that. Life can do that. If you haven't had your aspect of my life and I'm telling you one thing for certain that I know unequivocally like, like a law of physics, if you haven't got your ask, my life is forthcoming. No one gets through unscathed.

And so Gary's having a little bit of a, you know, he's, he's, he's had some really good wins and I was getting to ask him a little bit and it's like, dude, I knew that was coming. And so now I invest in him even more. Because it's like you want to get through, you want to get people that you know are going to go play, you want to get into those tough times. It's good to help when they're up but people who are really good don't really need your help so much when they're winning. They need your help when you're when you're when they're struggling.

But sometimes you can just tell you can lose it off to somebody who has 20 something 30 units and has done a bunch of flips and wholesales at 26 it's like 26 I was drunk. Three, four nights a week.

David:

It's a crazy thought to think there's this circle of entrepreneurs like guru leaders, right? Like there's the like, everybody knows Grant Cardone, Gary Vee Tai Lopez, Ed, my Led bedros cool Ian, you know, whoever right like there's this like group of people that I know are following. There's all kinds of groups depending on what you follow, you're going to know all these people have huge followings and have been massively successful. And they seem to know each other, right? Like a lot of them. There's a connection, whether it's an old connection or a newer connection or whatever, but they're all in there like 45-55, age range, right? And they're all like, so I find myself thinking sometimes as I'm hanging out with with people that I'm like, holy shit, like in a decade, like, that guy is going to be the next, you know, whoever and that guy is going to be the next. Because Grant Cardone may never stop. But some of those guys are going to be like, yeah, I'm rich, I've bought a boat.

1:05:00 - 1:10:00

Alex:

Do I have like a decent amount of money and it's not that much. And I'm already like, I have enough what I'll keep working for I can't imagine if you had 40 million like, what do you still like? Like, like, buy everything you want and go do everything you want. And don't worry about making money ever again. And at that point, honestly, you probably anything you do would make a lot. So it's kind of like,

David:

Put 30 million of it in bonds and just live off the interest. Blow the 10 like.

Alex:

Yeah, make a little bit of a cut. Well, once you're worth once you work some money too. And you can just go off and say hey, look, here's how I made my tears out of me 10 million bucks. It's like people throw money at you.

But yeah, I mean, some people quit. Some people keep going. It's interesting who you hang out with like it's sometimes demoralizing when you hang out with people that are younger than me that have done way more than me. And they're just getting started. And I'm like that, that's the ego check.

But also you have to remember like there's the overwhelming it's anecdotal, the most people aren't gonna bank for a long time. Let me tell you some of this country, most people are broke. I worked in the car business so most you'll have car payments, I can't afford it. None have money in the bank, like they're struggling. So if you're hanging around with people that are doing well, I have to go. I struggle with this, but I go hang out with people that are doing really well and are younger than me. And my first instinct is to get my ego hurt. And my second instinct is like, I must be doing something right, because these guys are unbelievable rock stars. This is not the norm.

David:

Yeah.

Alex:

The other thing is, well, you know, my, my bit is macroeconomics. If you're my age, if you're 35, and you went through the 2008 collapse in a, in a much more vulnerable position, then your situation is a lot different than someone who's 26 who just had a 10 year economic run like none like none other.

And so the longer term Economy we'll bounce some of that out too. But it's good to do if you're gonna be around young people that are killing people younger than you, then it sucks a little bit, but overall, I think it's a win.

David:

I agree. All right.

Book, resource, what do you get?

Alex:

I love books so much.

David:

I know.

Alex:

Books changed my life.

David:

That's why I ask so vaguely because I knew it'd be hard to answer.

Alex:

You know, the problem of books is like, what the books that worked for me worked at the right time. Like you can't just go off and get to know, a book that I never talked about that really changed everything for me, that would be good for everybody to listen to, or read.

The Richest Man in Babylon.

David:

That's a good one.

Alex:

That book because that book made like oh, spend less than you earn who fucking knew? Right. But I was an idiot. So if you're if your personal finances are not where you want to be like that book, just it's harmless. It can't hurt. There's no dogma. Good rules of money. And some of them I still listen to write some like, what's the fifth rule of gold? Like don't put it into something you don't know.

Don't give it to people you don't trust. Don't go after quick games, don't chase shiny, bouncy ball syndrome like stick to the basics, it'll work. But to this day, that seemed to love it anti fragile still, two years later. I think I'm gonna reread them and do a deeper dive review on them. They changed my life, the economic principles and the philosophy I listen to. I think I honestly want to get some that shit tattooed on me.

David:

Good series for sure. I'm glad you recommended those to me.

Alex:

I'm trying to think of what else that I really am. I have a list on my website. If you have kids, the coddling of the American mind is a good social book, an important book right now.

Chris Hitchens, there's a book called Letters to a Young contrarian, very you'll never see this book recommended by anybody but me. It's not a difficult read. But the guy's got a unique style. Chris Hitchens is very abrasive which I like and it's how to go into the world and disagree when you're social you know, it's very hard to disagree right now with people. You get a lot of social backlash and so the whole book is like, how do you deal with that. And it's a good primer.

Jordan Peterson wrote 12 rules for life. It's a little bit more popular than the books I usually read, but, you know.

David:

he's smart.

Alex:

Stand up straight with your shoulders back and take the terrible responsibility of life. That's fucking good advice, dude.

The Art of War. If you haven't read it.

I live and I have a tapestry of The Art of War hanging in my bedroom.

I got a quote here for by a Sunday that is another one that I love. When the enemy is relaxed, make them toil when full starve them when settled, make them move.

I live by that.

Nature, spoke Zarathustra. What a fantastic book about individuality and achieving your own, your ultimate self. So I'm rambling. I know I don't know if anybody's gonna read those books but.

David:

I got nothing now.

1:10:00 - 1:15:00

Alex:

And they're all on my website

David:

Yes, yes this episode will be titled Alex shamelessly plugs his entire existence.

Alex:

I’m not ashamed not to be shameful. It's all awesome stuff. So,

David:

Yeah, I'm in your book club.

Alex:

And bigger pockets do bigger pockets as a resource like, you know, dude, they're so big now we just take it for granted but that I've been on there for eight years, seven years now. And they're changing lives, man.

Go get the pro membership and tell him tell him you know, all my friends you get the pro membership like they earned that fucking money. They're providing super value, dude. Yep, bigger pockets. I'm so thankful for them. They changed my life.

David:

I mean, not only are they awesome, but they're awesome people to like, they just donated a pro membership for a year to somebody in my facebook group and three books, like I didn't ask them to do that. I asked them, Hey, you guys want to do some cross promotion type thing on Facebook groups, and they were like, I was like, I'm thinking about paying to give this away to some of my members. And they were like, I will just donate it.
Like, oh, okay, like $700 worth of stuff. Sure, thanks. or 600 or something like that. Like they're really cool.

Alex:

Incredible, incredible people. Yeah, Mindy is one of my close friends. One of my very close friends. And, you know, Zack really helped me out with the video series. Scott Trench and I are pretty pretty tight buddies these days.

David:

Before or after you who grilled him?

Alex:

Before.

David:

Been radio silence ever since not.

Alex:

You haven't talked much since then. But we only run into each other here and there. But yeah, I mean, that's just yeah. zakka Vp. He does a video aside. He's just He's incredible. Jessa, she has a blog there.

David:

The whole community is just awesome. Yeah, I mean, their editor is helping me on the side. edit my book. Like,

Alex:

Don't they don't hire anybody bad?

David:

No, they're all rock stars they're all great.

Except for you.

Alex:

Book resource.

David:

I know they hired you. So I don't know if I can say that anymore. But.

Alex:

What?

David:

We're agreeing that everyone at BiggerPockets hires is a rockstar that I realized they hired you for photography, so, I don't know.

Alex:

I can't cancel.

David:

That's true. Maybe that's why they were like, oh, man, we don't want to tell Alex knows. So let's cancel the whole event. Yeah, we don't want his wrath. Uh, you know, for me, that's such a good question. Like I have a few books up here. Um, honestly “Man up” by Pedro's cool Ian is one that just resonated with me. It was the first book that I ever read that really hit home about why I needed vision and how to create a vision. But it's more about just like, as the title says like Manning up when shit says I guess another four hour workweek was a really good one for me because the military mentality for work is unfortunately a lot of people think of like, I am going to get how do I get the least amount done and go home at 1630? Like how do I like it's just salary jobs in general, there's like this mentality of like, Okay, I have to get this much done to keep my job, go home, but this time, like, how can I get this much done in that amount of time, whereas once you become like, an entrepreneur, that mentality instantly needs to change to like, how do I get the most amount of shit done in the least amount of time to get more volume done, or have some free time with my life.

So that book was really helpful for me as far as just the mentality shift for like getting, like being efficient with things and hiring virtual assistants and stuff. Man, there's been a lot of good I'm like looking up here because I always try to come up with something different but just a lot of I mean some of those classic books like How to Win Friends and influencers, it's a good one if you want to learn how to talk to people, I really liked the book, The likes switch is like nonverbal cues and, and never split the difference which is like negotiation like those, I kind of like those. I know that's not your thing. I like some of those books.

Alex:

It is the same book, How to Win Friends and Influence People and never split the difference of the same book.

They're almost identical, in my opinion.

David:

Anyway, so, you know, I like, like, I am kind of like Alex and I differ because I'm one of those who's like, I need to learn about this. Let me go find a specific book on that topic. And so I kind of like to read more specific stuff like that. As far as like, man, I could say like the Miracle Morning because I know that would just make you fall out of your chair and die, but that's not what I would say.

Ah, you know, there's just I think, I think you hit it on the head when you said the right book for the right time, the right place you are in life. I think that's the key. And you know, a couple other smart people have said that on the podcast, like it's not about the specific book, it's about what you need to learn to grow.

1:15:00 - 1:19:00

Alex:

It's also not about one book. That's a mistake a lot of what books I read, like all of them. Yeah. All of them everyday. You should read a little bit. I read a book yesterday, I've got to finish it this morning called Fahrenheit 451. Apparently, people read in high school a dystopian fiction book about burning books, ironically. And what why would you need books for what's in those things? And it's, it quickly became one of my favorites. It's going to be one of my favorite books of all time. I like dystopian novels anyway. But this one happened to be about books, but I would have never read that book. I don't like much like fiction, I would have never read that book had I not shared a love of books with a mutual friend and we were looking for a book to read together and that one was both on our list or on my potential list, and you know, it's like you got to read all of them. You got to read all of them. That's the key, not one book, not the best book, an hour a day reading two hours a day, whatever it is. Books to change your life.

And I'm making so few people do it. It's like the way to become more, let me tell you something else. It does it first it makes you super competitive because most people don't read that many books. And when they do they get through the list of especially in our circle to get through the list of the self help staples. And that's how you got 10 of these done and now what most of you know how to win friends the E myth four hour workweek, Miracle Morning 10 acts rule that you know, it's like 10 of them and then and then okay, but now what are the rest of the world? You know, we're going to read Dawkins, Selfish Gene, all these other things.
The other thing that books will do is they'll give you intellectual confidence, like nothing else. You won't be, you won't be confident that you know what you know, and you know what you don't know. read some books, because you realize every time I read a book, I'm like, Oh, I have five more books to read. The things that I had, I just learned how little I knew.

And so it gives you a little bit of humility. And then also you start realizing like well, most people don't read any books. So now you become a cerebral stud compared to most of the competition so do books. It's cheap, and it doesn't take you a little here and there and it's like Dude, just quit watching it. You don't have to watch the office 24/7. You have to watch whatever nonsense you can watch on TV. just suck it up. Read that damn book for a little while. You'd be surprised why it'll change your life books. Books. Books, books, books.

David:

Yep, there's no downside. No downside at all.

Alex:

No downside. They're cheap. thriftbooks.com I ordered. I spend a lot of money on thriftbooks.com, I buy them on Audible. And then I play them in hardcover, so I can have them thrift books.com check it out.

David:

I should, because I kind of do the same thing, especially if it's a book that I really feel like there's more to unpack. I'll buy it hardcopy and read it again.

Alex:

I leave books out. I just open up the random pages and look through them and get ideas. It's just you know.

David:

All right. It's been like, an hour and a half. So I feel like we should probably wrap this up.

Alex:

Hey, if I could talk to the listeners, if you are in North or South Carolina or Virginia or somewhere within a three hour four hour radius of me, and you want to do a video project or photography project, reach out, I'm looking for stories to tell and talk people to create things with. Whether it's real estate or whatever. Let me know. I mean, this is my real shameless plug, just let me know I want to do some creative stuff with people in the community. So let's put some together.

David:

And if you're in Southern California, so am I. Tadaaa that's my plug.

Alex:

Yeah, you used to get both coasts, bro.

David:

Yeah. Eventually I'll be in the Midwest and then we can then I can talk you into driving 10 hours to come hang out with me.

Alex:

Pass, hard pass.

David:

Or I'll put you up in a shitty eviction unit at some point. crashed for free on the fucking linoleum.

Alex:

Nice.

David:

All right.

I don't have any cool exit for this. So we're just gonna hit the end button and hope you all have a wonderful day.

Alex:

Thank you to listeners for listening to 100 episodes of this and thank you David for having me on here. Thank you. Thank you. Thank you. Thank you,

David:

Listeners, you guys. It's been a great audience. You guys all know that I talk shit to you all which means I love you, so much. Oh, look the dogs up. We got Dumbo in the background.

Okay, all right. That's a good ending.

End:

Thank you for listening to another episode about my journey From military to millionaire. If you liked it, be sure to visit Frommilitarytomillionaire.com/podcast to subscribe to future podcasts. While you're there, we'd love for you to rate the show. Give us a review on iTunes. Now get out there and take action.

David Pere and Alex Felice on The Military Millionaire Podcast

Episode: 100

David Pere and Alex Felice

Join David Pere and Alexander Felice for Military Millionaire’s 100th episode! We get into the stories of how the amazing duo ended up where they are now. They also share real estate stories and give a peek on their other projects. Also, Alex plugs his entire existence. Stay tuned, and enjoy the podcast!

 In this episode, expect to hear:

  • When Alex realized that real estate was it!
  • Alex throws a strong curveball.
  • How Dave got into podcasting.
  • Alex starting on YouTube and blogging.
  • Being a little more extra and annoying introverts.
  • The value of personality tests.
  • Having too much free time.
  • “I’m here with Doug Nordman.”
  • Burning bridges with people that don’t care.
  • Life’s going to kick your ass!
  • The value of surrounding yourself with successful people.
  • The biggest list of resource recommendations on a podcast.

 Connect with David and Alex!

David’s LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/david-pere/

Alex’s LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/alexanderfelice/

David’s Website: https://www.frommilitarytomillionaire.com/

Alex’s Website: https://www.brokeisachoice.com/

Real Estate Investing Course: https://military-millionaire-academy.teachable.com/p/from-zero-to-one-real-estate-investing-101

Recommended books and tools: https://www.frommilitarytomillionaire.com/kit/

SUBSCRIBE: https://bit.ly/2Q3EvfE

Website: https://www.frommilitarytomillionaire.com/start-here/

Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/frommilitarytomillionaire/

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/groups/militarymillionaire/

My name is David Pere, I am an active duty Marine, and have realized that service members and the working class use the phrase “I don’t get paid enough” entirely too often. The reality is that most often our financial situation is self-inflicted. After having success with real estate investing, I started From Military to Millionaire to teach personal finance and real estate investing to service members and the working class. As a result, I have helped many of my readers increase their savings gap, and increase their chances of achieving financial freedom! – Click here to SUBSCRIBE: https://bit.ly/2Q3EvfE to the channel for more awesome videos!

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David Pere

David Pere

David is an active duty Marine, who devotes his free time to teaching personal finance and real estate investing for service members, and the working class!

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