Episode 56 | Brian Briscoe | Military Millionaire

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Brian Briscoe on The Military Millionaire Podcast

00:00 - 05:00

Hey, what's up guys? It's Dave From Military to Millionaire and today on the podcast, our guest, Brian Briscoe, has been in the Marine Corps for 18 years currently stationed in Washington DC, and diving into multifamily real estate.

So this is exciting because we get to talk a little bit about how he was able to avoid the crash in San Diego in the 2008 crash and how that and some of his other logical decisions rather than emotional have helped him to get into the multifamily world and achieve success.

So without further ado, thanks for listening. Show notes are found at Frommilitarytomillionaire.com/podcast. Now relax and enjoy the show.

Intro:

You're listening to the military millionaire podcast, a show about real estate investing for the working class. Stay tuned as we explore ways to help you improve your finances, build wealth through real estate and become a person that is worth knowing.

David:

Hey, what's up everybody? It's Dave from military to millionaire and I'm here with Brian Briscoe, who has been in the United States Marine Corps for 18 years.

Brian is a lieutenant colonel currently stationed out in the DC area. And he and I've, I've interacted a little bit on I just I don't remember if it was Facebook first and then I think it was Facebook first, right?

Brian:

It was on Facebook first. Yeah.

David:

Yeah.

And so we got in touch. We sat on the phone for like almost an hour the other night and realized that I should get him on the show.

So Brian, welcome to the show!

Brian:

Hey, thanks.

Thanks a lot. Thanks for having me. This is great. Appreciate it. Appreciate all you do.

You know, I think your podcast has a lot of value to people. And I think it's a very, very helpful thing, your Facebook page also as well. It's just a really good forum for people to go and just, you know, learn and ask questions. So I appreciate what you do.

David:

Thanks! That means a lot.

I've been trying to make it as useful as Facebook for like, the longest time was me just posting things and hoping people would comment. And it's really cool to see now that I'll log into Facebook and see Oh, my goodness, look at all these conversations that happened and I wasn't around. I love it!

Brian:

Yeah, I mean, when I start commenting on stuff, you know, next time I open my phone, it's like 87 notifications for Facebook. I'm like, oh, okay, let's see what's going on.

Yeah, so yeah, it's, it is a good forum. You know, and it's a good place just for people to ask, you know, there are there are no stupid questions, but I'm gonna say it, you know, good place with your last stupid questions. You know, if you're beginning and you don't know what, where do you even start? You know, it's a good place to go a lot of people there with lots of good experience. So anyway, once again, thanks for what you do for the brand you've created.

David:

Thank you very much!

Let's hear your story.

Brian:

Well, so I grew up in Utah. I'm not going to go all the way back to my birth. But, you know, I grew up in Utah. My dad thought he was a blue collar worker all my life because he wore a blue shirt to work, you know, but anyway, he was a letter carrier, you know, a great guy. So I went to high school, like everyone else, you know, decided to go to college, and I'll be honest, being in the Marine Corps was the furthest thing from my mind when I started college. You know, once upon a time, I wanted to be a college professor. And at one point in time, I started looking at my college professors, and they were all kind of like, socially backwards, you know, kind of awkward, or like, now, you know, I want their job, I just don't want to be like them.

And a friend of mine, one day was just talking about being in the Marine Corps reserves. And I'm like, that sounds pretty cool. You know, I'm gonna go check that thing out. So I went down to the recruiter and, you know, took a little time deciding but, you know, a couple months later, I was, you know, sending us yellow footprints MCRD San Diego, you know, enlisted with a college degree, which not a lot of people do. But, you know, get home from boot camp. And, you know, I started grad school, you know, I just got my degree, start grad school right afterwards, and just tell you how things worked out.

I started grad school in August of 2001. Alright, so, two weeks later, as a reservist World Trade Center goes down, you know, I'm like, Oh, my gosh, what's going on here? You know, and PSC. Briscoe is thinking, wow, I never realized it was going to someone's going to happen this quickly. So I decided to take things in my own hands and I walked down to the officer recruiter and said, Hey, PFC, I've got a degree, what do you got for me? Yes, I got this thing called Officer Candidate School that sends you out there. So, you know, long story short, I decided to commission and decided I was going to stay in the Marine Corps for three and a half years and go back to grad school.

So, you know, 18 years later, you know, here I am still on active duty, but it's been a good ride. I mean, you know, it's Yeah, that's it. That's it. It's been a really good ride and a fun time, learned a lot and had a lot of good experiences. You know, and I'm kind of at the end of the career phase. So I'm just Gently transitioning into something else.

05:00 - 10:00

David:

Absolutely. And that's actually really cool to think that, that you were sitting there in 2001 saying like, oh, man, well, let me just go and jump all the way in now. It's a cool response.

Brian:

You know, looking back at it, part of it, you know, a lot of the, you know, advanced college classes, once you get into grad school, they're only offered like, once a year, and there's certain series that you have to take in a row. And when I looked at, you know, my reserve unit, um, you know, the drill weekend after September 11, it was actually, you know, three days after September 11, that we had the drill weekend, and they made us do our wills and our powers of attorney. And I was like, Oh, my gosh, this is for real, you know, I didn't realize that, you know, some units do wills and power of attorney frequently.

But anyway, um, you know, I started looking at how things would work out. And I realized that if I got called up at the wrong time, for a one year deployment, it could, you know, delay my, my graduate school by up to three years, because of the sequencing of the courses, you know, some of the courses are offered every other year and things like that. So, you know, it was one of those things that made a lot of sense, you know, I could control the timeline.

You know, instead of waiting for the reserve unit to get called up and go as a PSE or Lance Corporal, I could control the timeline, I choose when it begins, I choose when it ends. And I'll be a Second Lieutenant, you know, a step or two up from a PFC, Lance Corporal, so, just a little bit, right.

You know, that was the thought process. And that's, that's what got me here. And at some point in time I cited, I liked it more than the idea of being a college professor. So simple.

David:

Well, and you can always be a college professor later on, and if you really wanted to, at this point, but, you know, you at least have the personality that is not a college professor at this time.

Brian:

I appreciate that.

Yeah, so I think that ship sailed, you know, a lot of people said the same thing. But, you know, that was a, that was a different person, it was a much different person, you know, 18 years ago, so I enjoy teaching, but I'm actually finding that, you know, in the real estate business, that I can still do a fair amount of teaching, I can still do a fair amount of, you know, helping people out. So it wasn't really the subject matter that I was in love with, you know, it's just teaching and I can still do that. So. So yeah, that's basically where I'm at right now, as far as far as that goes.

David:

And you can do it now, it feels like a job.

Brian:

Yeah!

David:

It's nice.

Brian:

Exactly.

David:

So tell us a little bit about your, like, when you got into real estate and how that's been going for you.

Brian:

You know, um, it wasn't long after I commissioned. So you know, probably 2003 timeframe. And this is going to be cliche. I'm sorry, I'm still gonna say I read Rich Dad, Poor Dad, right.

David:

On the shelf back there.

Brian:

Yeah, you know, and it's just one of those things where it just turned my mind upside down. You know, it was just like, I realized, you know, wow, you know, I had a poor dad, and I wish it you know, it's just one of those things that that changed my mindset on things, you know, and so, I did what I knew how, you know, I, the Marine Corps had, I don't know, if they still do, they had a savings bond program at the time when you could sign up and they would mail you savings bonds, you know, and so, every time I got a pay raise, I would put a little bit of money into the savings bond program, you know, and then I realized, Oh, they have this thing called the Thrift Savings Plan. You know, the same thing. I just started maxing that out thinking, Okay, I've got to do something I've got to deliberately plan for later on. I was in Okay, now at the time, I know, Rich Dad, Poor Dad does talk, you know about real estate, you know. And I made in my mind, right there that as soon as I get back to the States, I'm going to buy a house, you know, and I'm gonna rent it out. And then I'm going to PCS, I'm going to buy a new house and rent it out on PCS, you know, so that was my plan.

I PCS to San Diego in 2006, you know, which is probably the worst time in the world to buy a house. All right. Um, fortunately, I didn't, you know, fortunately we went shopping, and we looked around at what I can buy based off my BAH versus what I could rent, you know, and it was like, I can get a place twice as big for the same amount. And there was a big disconnect between rental prices and purchase prices. I just thought this can't be good. You know, this whole rental thing is not going to work out because I'm not going to be able to rent this for what I can sell it for what my mortgage is going to be.

10:00 - 15:00

Brian:

So fortunately, I didn't buy them. But I made up my mind that I would buy it soon. So the very next year, I started looking for a place in my hometown of Utah. You know, my wife would go up there and be with her parents and I would, you know, text her, you know, hey, I want you to go look at this house, you know, and she'd go look at three or four or five houses a day and come back. And, you know, after two weeks of that, my father in law called me and said, you know what, we're planning on moving soon. Do you want to just buy my house? I'm like, Yeah, sure. Absolutely.

So that was my first rental, you know, bought from my father in law is a really smooth transaction, you know, no haggling over price. He just says, we're gonna get into praise, and I'll take 5% off. I might have sold, you know, then the market crashed. You know, I was actually we had just closed in the house in the market crashed. Fortunately, Salt Lake City real estate didn't slide much. So the next year, we bought a house in San Diego. You know, the person before me had paid for 54, I paid 305. So I thought I had a great deal.

You know, and at the time, my goal was to, you know, one house a year for every year. The problem was that the house never had cash flow. You know, we got a pretty good deal on it. But when I tried to buy house number three, a year later, you know, no banks would give me a loan, you know, when I was doing everything on my personal credit, they just didn't know better, you know, I didn't know there's other ways to buy properties. And so basically, I set on two rentals for about 10 years, maybe a little longer, before I realized, you know, hey, this, this Marine Corps thing is going to come to an end soon, I need to kick it up into high gear.

So I deployed on a ship with the 11th view not too long ago, and read every book I could on real estate while I was there. And apartments is what really resonated with me, you know, just that there's a lot of advantages to investing in apartments that don't exist with single family homes. And, you know, rest is history, you know, I got involved with Michael Blanc, he's another podcaster, for anybody who doesn't know also does a coaching program. So, you know, I went all in with him. And, you know, it's been great.

So we found a couple of partners along the way. And, you know, right now we've got, you know, 55 unit deal that we'll be closing on, in October, they 32 unit deal that we'll be closing on in November and a 40 unit deal that we should be closing on December, you know, so, you know, things are going really well right now, as far as, as far as that goes.

Yeah, in a nutshell. That's how I got started. That's where we are right now.

David:

I think it was cool that you had the, whether it was foresight, or just intuition, not to buy in 2006. But then to turn around a buy when the market crash, not a lot of real estate investors or investors in general, can the art of taking the emotion out of your purchase decisions to say, Well, I don't want to buy now when everybody else is buying, and then also turn around and say, Well, I do want to buy now what everybody else is running. I think that piece in San Diego is huge, speaks something to your mentality that a lot of investors missed because they get emotional things.

Brian:

You know, and, you know, I don't know, if I told you what my degree was in. I'm a math guy, you know, and that's, that's all just straight out straight out numbers. And, you know, I had a plan of what I was going to do, and with, you know, rental prices way up here and mortgage prices even higher, you know, it just didn't pencil out, you know, in any way you've shaped.

So, a lot of times I will look at the I'll call that crash, the great real estate sale of 2008. You know, because everything went on sale. You know, we were really patient with that house, too. We had a place that we were renting, we were happy where we were. And we just started looking. And we wanted to find the right place. We found a place that was in pre foreclosure, pre foreclosure, like a lot of their places were, it was a short sale. And the owners were in the middle of bankruptcy, you know, so, you know, a lot of people didn't want to touch that. But we were happy where we were, it was less than a mile away from where I live, the kids would be in the same school, you know, my commute would, you know, be 30 seconds faster. You know, so we put an offer in and just waited.

They accepted our offer and it took us six or eight months to close because of the stuff that they had to go through to get it done. But you know, and it was like I said it took a lot of patience. But we found a good deal. And like I said, we never The one thing I didn't I wish I would have done better is just, you know, look at the actual rental prices in the area. But we own that house for about 10 years, I sold it recently to kick off the multifamily investment thing. But I walked away with a $140,000 check when I sold it.

So on average every month, we probably tossed two to $300 into that house, which is kind of a drain. But you know, at the end of the day, I think the 140 paycheck, you can do a lot of stuff with $140,000 in your back pocket. So.

15:00 - 20:00

David:

Yeah, I agree completely.

The math background is interesting. So I'm, I don't have a math background by any means. My college degree is an associates in real estate because it was a total cop out. But I wanted to finish an associate's degree just to say I did.

Brian: That was fun!

David:

It was easy, right? I didn't study for anything. But I've always been good at math. I was always the kid in high school. In fact, it's a funny story that I was homeschooled for most of the time I was in high school. And my mom caught me cheating once on a math test. And the reason I cheated on the test was not because I didn't know the answers, but because I didn't know how to do the work. And my mom would, she's going to listen to this. And like I'm saying this, but I would get, my answer would be wrong. If the work wasn't shown, I did not show the work. So I literally had done the math test, and then took the answer key and used it to show the work because I was just like, I don't care about how to do all the work on this. So I would like to pull the workout of the answer key. It's like the worst math, math cheating ever. But I'm just curious if that I mean, that probably does play a role. Because I'm, it's not hard for me, generally knock on wood to just totally lead the emotions about science. These numbers don't work. But.

Brian:

Yeah, it definitely helps.

You know, throughout my career, I've actually moonlighted as, like math teachers at community colleges every once in a while. And, you know, one of the classes I taught was a very, it was a good class as far as what they teach. I mean, most math classes when you're looking at algebra, u and x plus y and matrices, you're like, what am I going to use this?

There's a practical class that talks about interest rates and payment plans and everything else, you know, and I probably learned just as much useful stuff as everybody in the class. I mean, the level of the math wasn't very difficult for, you know, a math major, but, you know, I learned really kind of, you know, payment, how much money, you know, debt costs, you know, the very useful thing, you know, how quickly your money can grow, if you have it working for you.

So, you know, those are a couple of things that I learned just from the cold heart math side, you know, exponential growth is an amazing thing. You know, so, yeah, and then when we're when we're talking about apartments, you know, when we're talking about analyzing, you know, math, it's basically a big math problem is all it is, you know, so you're, you're looking at, you know, what, what's the growth rate going to be, you know, how fast do you think the rents are gonna grow? What the expenses look like, you know, you know, so manipulating the spreadsheets and doing a lot of the analysis that you need, is something that I'm really good at. So, you know, it's been a big benefit.

So yeah, I mean, everybody needs to bring something to the table. You know, that's kind of my super strength as far as what I bring.

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David:

It makes perfect sense.

You mentioned several things, that are, you mentioned that you really like apartments for multiple reasons, what are some of your favorite reasons for leaning towards the syndication or apartment way, as opposed to the single family?

Brian:

So scale? I think the scale works a lot easier. You know, for example, when you have a single family house, and you're trying to get a property manager, they're going to charge 10% because it's a single family house.

Alright, if you have a multi family property, when you go to the property manager, they're not charging you 10% anymore. All right, they're charging you 8%, maybe less depending on what you can, how many doors you have and what else is going on.

20:00 - 25:00

Brian:

The other thing is, you know, we're looking at a 40 unit apartment, there's four buildings for roofs, you know, if I have 40 houses, you know, instead of four roofs, I have 40 roofs that are going to have to be replaced. So there's a lot of economizing when you scale up. And I mean, the transaction is roughly similar to a single family house. I mean, each step is a little bit more complicated, but it's the same steps.

You know, you get under contract, you do due diligence, you work on getting a loan, and then you close, you know, there's a lot of little things in there, but it's the same process for multifamily. So it's like a buy one get 50 sale. And then the other thing is, you know, if you look at the the great real estate sale of 2008, single family houses dipped in price, a lot, multifamily Did not I mean, there was a little bit of a slide, but, you know, multifamily is based on rents, and net operating income. So that's basically, the, the, the most important thing when dealing with price for multifamily is what is the net operating income.

Alright, so it's based largely on your income, obviously. So income minus expenses gives you your net operating income. So if you look at what happened to rents during the last recession, rents went flat, they didn't go down, they went flat, for two years, in 2008-2009, they're roughly flat, and they started going back up again.

So, you know, you don't quite see the same dynamics, as you see in single family houses. So, you know, recession comes up, I'm not going to call them recession proof, they're just a little more resilient than single family houses. So I mean, that's, that's a lot. You know, I probably could give you a list of 20 different things, but let's just stop right there. And, you know, if you want to know more, you know, my whole list, you know, give me a call.

David:

The Marine Corps would be proud of you using that buzzword, resilient.

Brian:

Resilient, that's all about.

David:

That’s been the buzzword for the last few years around the Marine Corps. But I agree, I also love the way that they're valued. I have a huge love of it not being tied to at least not very much tied to what other properties look like, or do as much as just Hey, this is how much money this property makes. So it's worth that much. And that to me, is it just appeals for on so many levels. I'm analyzing, it's just a 12 unit right now. And you know, I'm talking to the guy and he's like, yeah, you know, I'm looking at this price. And I'm looking at his, his advertised p&l, which, usually when people lie on their p&l is that it's fluffed, I'm like, I really wonder if he just doesn't know what he's doing. And he, I mean, this p&l is so bad, that like, there's no way this is worth even half of what he's asking, but the price that I would offer him is so low, that it's not even, like..

Brian:

Yeah that's worth my time.

David:

Yeah, we get those a lot.

Brian:

You know, and you bring something up. That's another good point, is forced appreciation. Okay, so since the income or the sense of the value of the property is based on its income, if you can raise the income, you've raised the value of the property. Now, I'm not going to go into cap rates too much. But that also plays a part in it. But I mean, if you raise your net operating income by 10%, you've also raised the value of the property by 10%.

So you know, we do a lot of what we call value ads, where we go into a place that's maybe poorly managed, you know, maybe it's been rundown a little bit, and we should spruce it up a little. And when you screw something up, you can increase the income, or increase the rents, and thereby increase the income. And so instead of waiting for time, and inflation and all the market pressures, to drive the price up, you can force the price to go up by increasing your income, you know, and you spend a little bit of money to, you know, maybe new kitchen cabinets, maybe new countertops, you know, new floors, paint the walls, you know, for for a couple $1,000 you can really do a good job at raising your income level.

So, yeah, so that's, that's the other part that I really like about it.

David:

Absolutely.

I definitely love the multifamily area of the world as well. It's, you're doing it on a larger scale than I am, but it is just that I love the commercial side. I mean, everything just seems like you know what it is, it seems like a business as opposed to a residence. And I mean, obviously, it is commercial advice, residential, but I mean, everything from the loan process, everything is just emotionless business. If it makes sense, it works. And I love that it's so much simpler to deal with.

25:00 - 30:00

Brian:

I see a lot of people posting on you know. There's a couple of forums that I'm on Facebook that are real estate oriented. You know, and I see a lot of people post about their single family homes, you know, the ones that they've lived in for two or three years. And, you know, I can tell that they are not thinking about like a business, you know, and yeah, once once you get out of the single family homes, and I think it's easy for the house you've lived in to think about as that's my house, I don't want them to mess it up. You know, they shouldn't be doing that the carpets, the dog to to holes in the plantation blinds or whatever, you know, multifamily, it's, it's, you, you can take the emotion out of it, you know, so it's not something I'm ever going to live in, you know, but a lot of people will.

Anyway, yeah, I do appreciate that. It's, you see the same thing.

David:

I also want to commend you on not falling into the great Marine Corps trap. I don't know if you saw my post about this just the other day, but you use the word oriented as opposed to orient orientate?

Brian:

Orientate, yes.

David:

Yes, I made a full post the other day about word orientated and the misuse of the word caveat. And everything else that just drives me bonkers when I hear people.

Brian:

So many Marine Corps, the one Marine Corps is people, people misuse the word myself a lot, myself is going to do this. Work on your grammar a little bit, but I am going to do something, you know, you can do something. But anyway, there's a lot of little things that, you know, and usually, anyway, yeah. Oriente was one of those things. I looked up in a dictionary once when I was at the basic school as lieutenants. I'm like, no, that's not right. And it was so funny. When I saw the entry. I'm like, Oh, my gosh, it actually is in the dictionary. And then I read what it said it says, the improper use of the word orient. Alright, got it.

David:

Yep. Yeah, that's pretty funny.

Brian:

Orient. Got it.

David:

Exactly.

Alright. So I was rolling a couple questions.

So the first one I like to ask is, if E one, E two walked up to you asking you for advice. You only had a few minutes to share it, what would you tell them?

Brian:

You know, I tell them, they need to deliberately plan for their future.

You know, I think a lot of people just kind of let things happen. You know, if, if you have goals, you have a place you want to be, you know, if you know where it's you're talking about finances, we're gonna be talking about a job, that doesn't matter what it is, you need to deliberately plan to get there. Or where you're not going to get there is basically what I would say, you know, I think. It took me a couple of years to realize that, you know, I was probably 30 something before I realized, yep, I probably should start planning for something post Marine Corps.

But yeah, for E one, E two understand that at that age, and start deliberately planning, you know, I think that's, that's probably what I tried to get through.

David:

That's funny, I gave my first little toastmasters speech in the new club I'm in yesterday of icebreaker. And the topic of the meeting was the power of now, or, or something like that. And my closing line was essentially, like, basically, trying to say is like, now is important, but I said the power of now is that the decisions you make change the trajectory of the future. And so the power of now is not that now is so important, it's that you can plan ahead and utilize that to see where you want to go. As I've been trying to work on my vision, because that's been something I've struggled with for the last year, try to map that all out. I think I finally got some clarity in there, but it's powerful.

Brian:

Yeah, it is. It is.

You know, one of my favorite books is Stephen Covey's seven habits. And he talks a lot about, you know, you can create your life, you can create the life that you want, you got to be proactive, you gotta put, you know, first things first and begin with the end of mind, but you can create that life, you know, and if you don't, you know, it's going to be created, you know, it's just not going to be you, you the creative.

So, yeah, we do have the ability, you know, each given second to, you know, change the direction of our lives. We don't like where we're going every second, every now is a chance to change the direction we're going. It's also a chance to, you know, reinforce and double down and, you know, persevere and keep going forward to so. Yeah, anyway.

David:

Absolutely.

Alright. What is one resource, book, course, website, you know, whatever that you would recommend to anyone getting started in real estate investing?

30:00 - 35:00

Brian:

Um, you know, I'll tell you what I went through. I went through Michael Blunts program. You know, I started out just buying his spreadsheet, you know, which is ridiculously amazing. You know, it's got like, 87 tabs and it took me you know, many many hours to figure it out. But it is so powerful and what it does And then from there, he's got an online coaching or online instruction program, you know, so incrementally, I just kind of bumped up a little further.

So, you know, so I did that and then started going to some of his events. He lives in Northern Virginia not too far from where I'm at. So, you know, it's not hard to, you know, drive down the road to go to one of his big events. And eventually, I got into his coaching program, you know, so that's really been, I think, the catalyst for me, it's given me the knowledge, and this gives me the confidence, I met my business partners through his, his, his forum.

So that's probably the number one thing that I'd recommend. But there's other programs out there, you know, for active duty. ADPI has a pretty good program. So there's lots of resources, I would just say, figure out what you want, and find somebody who's good at teaching.

David:

I agree, I think there's a lot of information out there right now, you just have to figure out who you want to learn from. And I'm not advocating for spending $70,000 on a program from somebody, that there are affordable programs out there and coaching and ways to get around people. But I definitely think it's worth paying to save yourself time.

Brian:

And, you know, I looked at it, and you know, the coaching program wasn't cheap, you know, and not everybody can afford it, you know, but I looked at it as an investment. I looked at it as a way to accelerate my success.

You know, I'm the type of person I put my mind to something, I'm gonna get it done. You know, so when I was looking at that, and it's, you know, getting into multifamily is not cheap as well. I mean, if you're doing a single family house, your earnest money deposit is, you know, 1-2000 you know, I sent a $40,000 earnest money deposit out, you know, I sent a $15,000 earnest money deposit out, you know, so when looking at, okay, I've got finite resources, what I'm going to spend it on you I deliberately chose to spend it on that coaching so that I didn't waste the rest of my, my little pot of money to play with.

So yeah, learn, learn from people who've done it. And it doesn't mean you have to pay money either. I mean, you can find somebody to add value to them, and see if they'll teach you, you know, so. But that's, that's the thing, you got to be able to add value to them. But yeah, that's, that's it. Find somebody to teach you.

David:

Yeah, absolutely. And some of those courses are totally worth every penny. Definitely got my money's worth out of a lot of courses. And I've probably spent and if you count events and conferences this year, I'll probably rack up over 10 grand and in coaching and stuff so.

Brian:

I'm not far behind you.

David:

Yes.

Brian:

I was actually supposed to be rod police event in Baltimore right now. I bought tickets for that. I even upgraded to VIP but I am TAD in Miami right now. So I am not in Baltimore. But they were kind enough to roll my tickets forward to January's event in Los Angeles.

So yeah. So if you guys want to come see me in LA, let's do it.

David:

Yeah, have looked into it, I haven't one of those weird spots similar to you. Where I've had three different leave requests disapproved so far for this year for events, and I'm so right now, I'm kind of iffy on spending money on tickets, because one of the events I'm not going to get my money back out of and it was substantial.

And, you know, most of them were pretty willing to play ball. But yeah, the kind of iffy on jumping into anything until I make sure I'm gonna be there at this point. But yeah, that's the price we pay for still running full time jobs. And you know, that we enjoy. So, at the end of the day, eventually, we'll both transition out and be full time unable to go to all the events we want. And somehow I feel like I'll fill my entire life with events instead of not doing anything and relaxing. Like I tell myself, we're going to do but..

Brian:

Events are so amazing. I mean, you meet people that are doing the same thing you're doing. I always walk away with the events with a lot more energy, you know, so, yeah, so that's one of the things you need to do, you need to get out, you need to meet people. You know, that's it.

David:

Absolutely.

Alright, before we wrap this up, any anything you'd like to add any parting advice or big ideas?

Brian:

Big Ideas? Um, you know, my big idea, you know, it's really not that, it's actually simple, you know, yeah, we're getting bigger every time we do something, you know, so, you know, the first couple of permits we had under contract, you know, or, you know, all I think the biggest one is a 40 right now, so, you know, we're trying to tackle an 80 and after that 80 we're trying to start tackling 100 and above so, yeah, basically, don't be afraid to go big, you know, do it smartly. But don't be afraid to go big is what I gotta say.

35:00 - 37:25

David:

Wait a second brother. We mentioned it before. A lot of people on this podcast have heard about a 40 a year ago, it did not work out quite as well as it should have. But it'll work out in the end, we're going to solve all that out, we're getting closer to solving all that, and you'll get everything back. I don't regret for a minute making the decision to execute on that. Because B, I still think it was a decent deal. And B, I have learned more about the legal process and the recovering and what I could have done to protect myself better in the future and what I you know, whatever, that just saved me so much headache throughout the rest of my life. It's been totally..

Brian:

It's a seminar, you know, it's not a failure. It's a seminar, as long as you learn from it, so.

David:

Exactly.

Brian:

Yeah.

David:

Alright, Brian, where can people get a hold of you?

Brian:

So our website is fouroakscapital.com. If you're listening to it, you know, it's just the number four spelled out four oaks capital. If you're watching it, you know, I got the shirt that says four oaks capital on it. But you know, it's got my contact information up there, you can fill out a form, you know, and we'll get back to you.

If you're interested in investing in one of our products. You know, you can also reach out and contact me and we'll get to know each other. See if we're a good fit. My email address is my first name. And my last name is together at fouroakscapital.com. So [email protected] Simple.

David:

I like it.

Brian:

Yeah.

David:

Awesome. All right. Thank you very much for joining us this evening.

Brian:

Yeah. Hey, thanks for your time. Thanks for having me. I really appreciate your time.

David:

We'll stay in touch.

Brian:

Yeah, we will.

David:

Maybe one of these days. I'll be on the east coast. Probably not.

Brian:

Yeah, I'll probably get to the west coast sometime soon, too.

David:

There you go. I don't know, grab the subway or something. Because I don't ever get out of the office except for lunch.

Brian:

Yeah, you know, I'll bring you a Subway sandwich and a Diet Coke or something. You know, we can sit it. Yeah, see your place.

David:

Works for me.

Awesome. Thank you very much for joining us.

Brian:

I appreciated it. Thanks.

End:

Thank you for listening to another episode about my journey From military to millionaire. If you liked it, be sure to visit Frommilitarytomillionaire.com/podcast to subscribe to future podcasts. While you're there, we'd love for you to rate the show. Give us a review on iTunes. Now get out there and take action.

Episode 56:

Brian Briscoe

Brian Briscoe is a Lieutenant Colonel in the Marine Corps, and a multifamily-apartment syndicator.

Brian enlisted in the Marine Corps as a reservist, and it wasn’t until after September 11, 2001 that he decided to commission as an Officer in the Marine Corps. Brian has purchased single family real estate for several years, but was smart enough not to buy a home in San Diego when he was stationed there in 2006. As a result of this, he was able to swoop in on a short-sale property in 2009, and build a substantial amount of equity in that home.

Brian is now focused on multifamily apartment syndications, and his team currently has 127 units under contract!

His advice to an E1/E2 is: Deliberately plan for your future

the resource she recommends is: Michael Blank

His big idea/parting advice is: Don’t be afraid to go big!

You can reach out to Brian and his team here: www.fouroakscapital.com and you can Email Brian at [email protected]

SUBSCRIBE: https://bit.ly/2Q3EvfE

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Building Wealth: https://amzn.to/2ttiwpf

Efficiency: https://amzn.to/2K1eRdy

Efficiency: https://amzn.to/2yvuu7K

Negotiating: https://amzn.to/2tmCyT7

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David Pere

David Pere

David is an active duty Marine, who devotes his free time to helping service members, veterans, and their families learn how to build wealth through real estate investing, entrepreneurship, and personal finance!

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