Episode 110 – Donny O’Malley on The Military Millionaire Podcast

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Donny O'Malley on The Military Millionaire Podcast

Episode 110 – Donny O’Malley on The Military Millionaire Podcast

 

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00:00 - 05:00

David:

What's up everybody we have, I'm excited about this episode. So my buddy Rio hooked this up. I met him a little while back, we were talking and he just casually mentioned his first ever YouTube video. And he pulled it up on his phone and it was him at the original silky hike doing push ups in the back of ABC News, like podcast broadcasts, whatever they were called. And it was him and Donny O'Malley. And I was like, you know, Donny O'Malley. I've been trying to get a hold of Donnie for a while to get Donnie on the podcast. And he's like, Oh, yeah, we're homies. And then bada bing, bada boom, a few weeks later, people are awesome.

So Rio hooked us up. Donny O'Malley, for those who don't know is the guy behind Reverend Warriors. He is also which is like Soucie hikes, and veteran suicide and all kinds of cool stuff. And he's also behind vet TV, which is like, the funniest freakin streaming service ever. It's the kind of humor that you're like, I hope my parents never know that I like this stuff, because it's so crude, but it's everything you could have ever laughed about. While you were deployed. And I love it. And he's a Marine Corps officer.

So I brought out some scotch to drink on the show, because fuck it. And for those of you listening, this is going to be explicit. So if that bothers you, just I don't know. Mute it. Watch it anyway, because we need to, you know, downloads no, I'm just kidding.

Alex, how are you?

Alex:

I'm well, how are you?

David:

Dude, I'm good. You know, you know what, I don't ever do that. I need to get better at doing things. We need to get better at doing our show. I just realized this.

Alex:

I thought our show is perfect.

David:

It is except I was thinking we should start doing like you're listening to the military millionaire podcast show number, whatever. Because that's, I don't know, podcasts do that.

Anyway. But what we do need to do or at least I need to do is say, hey, guys, if you like this fucking show, you should leave us like a five star review. And subscribe so that like other veterans can get some good stuff out of this. On that note.

Yeah, I see Donny in there. So what do you say?

Alex:

I can do that sales pitch. Yeah. So what happens is, people forget to give us the review. And they think about adding the word. I'm the only one that didn't do it. And then nobody doesn't. You're all jerks. Unless you've already done it.

David:

Those are one star reviews right? Did I show you the one start?

Alex:

No, I don't care.

David:

Yeah, it was basically just some guy saying we were jerks. Because we said that if you're not rich, you didn't work hard enough. You could work harder. To which I said, well, he probably didn't work very hard. So

Alex:

Okay. Bring it stuff. Who cares? Yeah, we only care about five star reviews. Everything else I don't care about. Yeah, I don't care about that. Leave us, leave us a five star review. So we can um, get paid son. That's all I'm here for is to get fucking money.

David:

Oh, yeah, I haven't made a penny. But you haven't. I've made a penny or two. Not a whole lot. Maybe three pennies.

Alex:

So go to itunes. Give me a five star review.

David:

Maybe I'll bring Alex on the payroll if you guys give us enough reviews.

Alex:

Yeah, I need to get a I need to pay for overeats bro.

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Intro:

Welcome to the military millionaire podcast where we teach servicemembers, veterans and their families how to build wealth through personal finance, entrepreneurship and real estate investing.

I'm your host, David Pere, and together with my co host, Alex Felice. We're here to be your no BS guys along the most important mission you'll ever embark on, your finances.

Roger, Vick, One, Oscar, Mic.

David:

What's up military millionaires. I'm your host David Pere. And I'm here tonight with my co host Alex Felice in his pink and flawless hair as always, but tonight, we have the one and only Donny O'Malley the same Donny O'Malley who is behind the Reverend warriors and started the silky hikes which you should all know about. And also vet TV, which we're going to talk about tonight, but if you haven't heard of that TV, you should go check it out right now because it's a phenomenal streaming service that is hilarious. as fuck and I love it, it's the kind of comedy that you probably wouldn't watch around your mom. But I would watch it around all of the guys I serve with, and it's fucking awesome.

So, Donny, this is gonna be fun. Thanks for joining us tonight.

05:00 - 10:00

Donny:

Dave, thanks for having me, man. Happy to be here.

David:

Absolutely.

Let's so could you give just a little bit of a background about it's kind of your story of what, you know, time in the military or whatever and up to present just a quick snapshot for our listeners?

Donny:

Sure, sure.

Okay, I started military, joined at 25 and became an infantry officer. That was my dream. And it was my intention to join the Marine Corps, I just wanted to do four years in the grunts that I wanted to go marsoc. And I think that incurs a five year commitment. And then I wanted to get out.

At first it was recon. And then I learned about marsoc and that’s what I wanted to do and so I came in, and I got infantry officer spot, which was the fucking sickest thing, it was such a dream come true.

And then, and then had two deployments of new combat pumps, had incredibly fortunate military experience. I just, I feel like the luckiest person in the fucking world. Because of how much of the Marine Corps I got to experience in a short period of time.

And you know, just the amazing people that I was fortunate, fortunate enough to be raised by, like, I was raised by dudes that had done, you know, any two to five combat pumps, like the seasons, the warriors raised me. And like, that was an incredibly fortunate thing to be a part of that. And then my body is just weak. So I ended up getting medically separated. I spent the last year and a half word diet, skipping surgeries, being a little bitch, got separated.

And all I wanted to do was start a production company. That was my dream. Since I was 19 years old, I was like, I'm going to start a production company. And my staff are my friends and family. And we're going to make a living, making people laugh mimicking each other. And that was when I developed that vision when I first learned about Adam Sandler's company. Happy Madison seems to be what he was my favorite, like, of all time. And then I learned about what he did was happy Madison, like he started a company and they literally everyone in his family got a job doing something. And I was just like my family so much like his did I imagine if I made movies with my family, but a dream.

So that's what I set out to do. But then my fuckin stupid buddy killed himself and fucking wrecked down that fucking plan. And then I had to start that TV. Thanks to him. Fucking schmuck great.

Um, yeah, so I set out to write a book, I published it. And then I was going to make another book, and make another book and build an audience. And then I was going to start making short films, then longer films, and that's how I was going to get to my dream company.

And so after the first book, which was embarrassing confessions of a Marine Lieutenant, I developed a decent following, because I was only trying to entertain a very small group of people. I was just trying to make my buddies laugh. So it's like, fucking, you know, let's all come together and laugh. It's all I wanted to do with that book.

And then my buddy killed himself, right before the book was published. And so I did a bunch of research on suicide, and I came up with an actionable plan for suicide prevention in my book, fuckin, I'm, like, this really is hit me recently. And I was like, holy shit, I, I really need to share this because I, I had this, this vision a long fucking time ago, and I didn't even know it. And it kind of all came together through veteran television. But it was an actionable plan. And the plan to prevent suicide was so simple. It was to facilitate connections between veterans with shared experiences.

And the most intensively shared experience is like your buddy guy you want to fight with or a truck with in combat, like that guy is probably more connected to you than many people in the world. And then outside of that, it's someone else in the squad and someone in the platoon, company, maybe battalion but I think after that it's a battlefield.

And so if you can connect people by introducing them to people who were both at alesana, or I'll talk about in 2004, right, even though they're totally separate units doing different jobs, they could start talking about what it was like being an outsider no for and they'll be connected. Right, like it's a weird, powerful connection. I've been seeing it everywhere because I've been going to fucking hosts in like live events for fucking since my book came out, and I, I would watch these connections happen. And then that turns into a friendship and that friendship literally keeps people alive.

10:00 - 15:00

Donny:

You have these little microcosms of friendships being created all over the country that ends up creating a greater sense of community. And so that's what all of this entertainment that we're doing is intended to do. This what I listed out in the my fucking book years ago, not even realizing it, like that's the formula for preventing suicide, it's so simple, get him to come together and laugh and connect people with shared experiences.

So that was the book that became a revenue warrior connecting people together at these events. And we don't do as it's not completely formalized yet. But in some places, we'll have name tags, and it's like, right, don't even bother writing your name. Just write about a field that you fought on, or a unit that you've been in.

So now someone sees someone h, t q? No way. What are you there, bam, the conversation started. It's like you're injecting fuel into this conversational fire that you want to create amongst people, amongst veterans, and it's all to prevent suicide. So red warriors came first. And then VetTV came next. And the mission is to say, use humor and camaraderie to get people together for mental health and prevent suicide, you know.

David:

Dude I love it. And in the same vein of what you just said, so I was in Afghanistan in 2010 and worked right alongside to five so when I saw your some of your bio stuff, I was like, hey, I was in Marja with those guys. So I was back then 2010, Marja, Sangin, whatever. So when I was looking through stuff, I was like, that's interesting. So funny. You brought that up, I'm just gonna...

Donny:

Wow, like, that's what a crazy place to be motor T, bro. Fuck that shit.

David:

I worked with the security team. But uh, well, we can dig into some of that stuff. You said some interesting things that really resonated with my experiences. But this isn't about me. And you. This is about you. So, Alex, might ask a question.

Alex:

Actually, I want to be selfish.

How did you start a production company? I just got into videography recently. And I I feel like I want to do a short film.

Donny:

Yes.

Alex:

I don’t want to do I don't want to do comedy like you. I don't think I could do comedy. I saw a lot of your stuff. It's a it's so it's a far cry from I'm sure what you learned as an infantry officer.

So what was the transition? Was your transition, or were you doing redoing on video production while you're in?

Donny:

Um, no, I mean, I did a couple of goofy, funny skits with my friends. Maybe three or four of them weren't real filmmaking.

Actually, at the end, when I was getting tired on my way out, I made a couple of music videos, actually. I think that really taught me pacing and timing in the end of the fundamentals of editing.

So yeah, I did that. But that was it.

Alex:

You are filming and editing yourself?

Donny:

Back in the day, I edited myself. I don't do more.

David:

Yeah. Probably got more expected and more valuable uses of your time at this point.

Donny:

Yeah. The director sits with the editor though.

David:

Sure.

Alex:

No, I was just curious. I'm just curious how it manifested.

Donny:

Oh, I'm in a Kickstarter campaign.

So well the first thing that I did was I made a video to market my book. And this is after I have been doing the nonprofit river warriors like going full speed full sand. I forgot about the book. I didn't want people to think I was using the nonprofit to market the book. So I literally stopped talking about it. Never I didn't have a phone anyways, but I never posted and didn't say shit about it. Or sometimes people would be like, hey, didn't you write a book, but it was nothing I was pushing. That was intentional.

So then finally, like a year after starting it, I'm like, you know what, I'm so fucking burned out of this shit. I need it. I set out on a mission to publish a book and become a writer. And I need to market it like a fucking proper author.

So I made a video to market it and that video was just intended to make grunts laugh. And that video went viral and that was titled the first woman to graduate IOC discovered to have penis.

Alex:

Of course, it was Naughty.

Donny:

first thing I ever made. And channeling my force for a woman in the infantry. I channeled that frustration into that one sketch, and it fucking hit. And then I did it again a week later, and a week later and a week later. And then finally someone was like, Holy fuck, no one's doing this. I would pay for this. And I was like, okay, well, how can I make up for myself selling this product. And then my research took me to No, it's got to be a subscription thing I can't, there's no way to distribute it and maintain a decent enough profit margin. So it's got to be a subscription service. And it can't just be run. It's got to be for the whole military community. Yeah, that's it. That's what I got to do. And then I started thinking about branding and stuff. And I just did a bunch of research on branding. And I Google, Google is everything. And Google taught me everything I ever knew.

15:00 - 20:00

And so figure all these things out, but 99 designs, had the logo made, and then I trademarked it, because I knew is a fucking sick ass idea. And I knew someone would take that shit. And so I trademarked everything. And then I made a post on my blog, which didn't have much traffic at all.

But it said, hey, I have this vision for veteran television. This is the vision of the whole business, these are the first 10 shows we could make. And this is how much it's gonna cost. This is why it's important. This is who we're going to market it to. I just fucking threw it out there to the world. And in two days, people are calling me pitching me shows. It's an idea. A fucking idea. People are already pitching me shows like I'm some network executive. I'm like, slow down, bro, I have no idea what I'm doing. And then we did a kickstarter campaign, and then hired a couple people, and then off to the races from there producing the content.

Alex:

Awesome.

Dude, that's awesome. I just started doing videography. That's why I asked selflessly. But I think that story is fantastic. Because again, like people see you, they know you produce it, they see you in it. But again, I know, I work on camera. So I know exactly how much. You know, I know the miserable end of that.

And it's a lot of work to do the production side.

Donny:

Yeah.

David:

That's cool, though. The fact that so I tell people a lot that like the reason I think a lot of service members are successful, whether in entrepreneurship or real estate or whatever.

One, I mean, there's a lot of reasons right. But I think one of the things is that they're decisive, like if they see something they like, they're not afraid to jump at it and go all in and see what happens. You literally like, made a video and had an idea. And you were like, well, let's post this and see what happens up. Fuck it. We're going all in. And I think that's, I mean, that's awesome. Like a lot of people would have had would have had all kinds of hesitations and second guessed it or whatever. And that's cool.

Donny:

Thank you.

I like to think it's, it was a lifetime of setting small goals for myself and accomplishing them in developing this completely petrified belief in my ability to do whatever the fuck it is I want to do.

So it's now all I have to do is see it. And then I can make it reality. That's been it's constant non stop goal setting. That's what drives me.

David:

I like it.

Alex:

That's awesome. That's awesome.

Dude, I saw your website. I saw your website. It is mostly nonsense, I think.

Donny:

Oh, yeah, I gotta edit that fucking thing.

Alex:

Look at this guy's website. I'm like, is this a purpose? Or is he just fucking around?

Donny:

Oh, you know, it's actually it's funny story. We had a good dude, re-do the website. I don't remember why we did it. And he created a format that I agreed upon. And then I was supposed to fill in the blanks. Fill in all the lower medicine backwards Greek crap. And I just never have. probably a year.

David:

Oh, man, that's awesome.

Donny:

I think it's point like six months ago, I was like oh fuck, I gotta do that. Where is the fucking website. And I looked at it and I was like, it's kind of funny if I leave it like this. I just don't give a fuck and it'll save me so much time. Okay, I'm doing that and I forgot about it till right now.

Alex:

Dude, I'll tell you what I'm going through. I'm like, some of these fields are filled out.

Some of them are done. Some of them are not most of it. I'm like this dude out of that fight. Basically, when I was reading this, I mean obviously I've never met you before but that's pretty much the answer I was expecting.

And it looks like a pretty pretty fucking funny the way it is. So.

Donny:

I did that.

David:

It’s authentic. I love it.

The funny thing is I was cruising through it today at work on the government computer, whatever. And so I just assumed that the reason nothing was like it was like halfway filled out or whatever was that the computer had glitched out and I'm like dad doesn't let me into half the stuff I look at so I didn't even notice that. So that's even. That's hilarious.

20:00 - 25:00

David:

Oh, man. All right, so I got a question I'm gonna ask. So one of my friends is actually a friend of mine from high school. Trey Rosenbaum asked that, so I threw it in my facebook group today like, hey, what kind of questions you got? I mean, interviewing this guy you may have never heard of.

And so, so he said, for one. He said he loved that TV. But he said that the reason is, it's so it's some of the last comedy out there, that's not censored. And he's curious what your thoughts are, on some of the biggest issues facing that TV or censorship in general, with kind of the canceled culture craziness going on like you? Is that? Is that a thought for you at all? Or is it because you're self contained stream streaming? You're like a, oh fuck it.

Donny:

Well, are you ready for this shit? You know, you don’t believe me, people, what most people don't believe me.

I have no idea what's going on in the world. I have the news blocked on my Chrome and my phone. So I cannot see the news. I do not have regular cable television. And I don't ever I don't even I don't have the inclination to browse. In fact, I I know for a fact that it's better for my success and success of my business if I passionately avoid the news and avoid anything outside of my little bubble.

I fight for that.l

David:

Like the greatest answer you could have given. So at work, they turn on the TV and they turn on the news and I'm constantly getting in trouble for turning it off. Like what are you doing? I'm like, my life is better when I'm at home. And this isn't on. Like if something big happens. Somebody will tell me and I don't really care.

So I completely understand and agree with that. I have cable for my Airbnb guests. I don't think I've ever sat in front of the TV and watched anything but the office maybe once on it. But that's funny. I like that.

Donny:

Yeah, that's the key is fuckin I think I Tim Ferriss said it. You said focus is the superpower of an entrepreneur.

You can focus.

Alex:

And that goes along with your goal setting to just yeah, just worry about what the thing I have to do in front of me. And then the rest is superficial.

Donny:

Yeah. My brain is literally deleting parts of the past. Because it's so obsessed with what's in my future.

And it's sad. I passed the sickest fuck.

David:

I love it.

Donny:

I'm sorry, Alex, do you want me to repeat it? Which part?

Alex:

No, no, I heard I got I got I heard you tonight.

Donny:

Oh okay.

Alex:

So, um, so, how long has that TV Vet been out?

Donny:

3 years and 3 months?

Alex:

What's the growth been like?

Donny:

From 0 to 93,000 subscribers.

Alex:

Good for you dude.

Donny:

Yeah. And if I were to add to that description, a dash, painful.

Alex:

Um, how big is the production company? How many? Are you guys just out of California?

Donny:

Yes, we are based in Carlsbad, North County, San Diego. And then we do most of our filming in Riverside.

David:

I realized you were that close to me. I'm gonna have to crash the set and get hammered. I’m just kidding.

Donny:

Uh, come to the office one of these days when we start having get-togethers again, because we have fun little gatherings.

David:

Sounds good.

Donny:

Yeah, man.

Um, so where's that Willie? Yeah, that's where the company is. We have a 21 full time staff. And at any given time, when we are in production, we have like, you know, the cast and crew that production is going to be another like, anywhere between 20 and 120 contractors for somewhere in that two to four week period that we're filming.

Alex:

Wow.

Donny:

That's an expensive, expensive production every time. It's not possible to do it. Very cheap. If we're going to do it, right, according to labor laws and whatnot.

So that's part of why Hollywood always had such incredibly high expenses. Why movies always cost a lot. But what they found is that they don't need to be that high. So like, what we were operating in terms of television production. It's not even it doesn't even rank within television. Because television production is so much more than that.

We rank like web series. Even though we make scripted television. We just don't give a fuck about what any other network has to say about it or think about it like bizarre shit. But this is a fucking television show. So our production costs making scripted television is incredibly low relative to the larger industry, but it's still super fucking high.

Which makes growth incredibly hard or painful.

25:00 - 30:00

Alex:

Yeah, well, I don't know, I don't know much about the TV industry other than they go through, they're going through that problem in droves right production, the dissemination is getting cheaper. And so therefore, you're studying production costs. And then you know what, something like 90% of movies in the theater bomb and they make all their money on that on Marvel movies...

Yeah, so if you don't have to pay Robert Downey Jr. 100 million dollars. And you don't have to worry about appeasing Warner Brothers or Disney where the fuck you know, the stock movie theaters then and you have a what sounds like a growing and fantastic dissemination distribution system. Dude you're in the fucking money.

Donny:

Yeah, we just want to be community filmmakers. That's what we technically classify as community film.

We're focused on our community, and that is always going to bring everyone involved success, because we're going to keep creating jobs like, non stop.

David:

Yeah.

Alex:

What, um, what's next, you set your focus guy, obviously goal oriented, so you want to create a production company. Clearly we've done this.

Donny:

Um, what's next is we're hiring department heads with decades of experience. And we just hired a woman named Shireen Anderson, who spent almost 20 years at Disney and got very high up launched Disney plus, right like a subscription video on demand service.

She's done this before. And now we finally brought her onto the team. We've been like we've been recruiting some talent to come in. And she's the first hire, first of them.

So you know, our growth is going to exponentially increase in terms of what we are our output we're going to produce much more television and we're going to have weekly segments so like a weekly troupes gone wild and then a weekly musical show where it's all user generated stuff and then my, what I want is to have a meanwhile in the field or meanwhile the barracks like one of the two that comes out weekly right like a first episode of you on the field just launched tonight that shows fucking, that show kills me and...

David:

I can only imagine because I know what Marine Corps infantry version of what happens in the field.

Donny:

Oh, that shits gay as fuck bro.

Alex:

Isn't like life ED, but for the army for the military?

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Donny:

This is actually not for everyone this this so it's a the overarching series has been on the field but then we're going to have like miniseries beneath it that are kind of dedicated to different units.

So that way we're spreading the love all around right and connecting people with this by getting all these people to come together and watch the show about their unit. You know, we break it down all the way to the platoon and then there's three episodes, three episodes after that is going to be the hundred and first rock astons which the rock Hassan's have a really awesome legacy.

And so anyway, so yeah, so that's this show me what I would love for that to be weekly, want to grow in life to be fucking like at least twice a year. And then up the budgets for some of the stuff so we can get more action, like legit fuckin gangster ass gun fighting. Warfighting so yeah, that's, that's my larger vision to have a podcasting network and addition to television and then a movie division.

30:00 - 35:00

Donny:

And that movie division is not even focused. It's not fucking on television, it's a different type of writing, and then and distribution. So movie division is now creating a movie that's potentially based on one of the television shows, that's proven its value to the audience.

And so anyway, so that's, that's what we're trying to do. You know, we're gonna have our own little, little filmmaking community that this is pumping stuff out for the community. And, but funny documentaries, more shit, like bears laughing together, animation, good books, comic books, and we got it, we actually have a military dictionary coming out. And I think by Thanksgiving, that's just going to be full of goodies.

Alex:

I bet.

Donny:

Yeah.

David:

Oh, man, I love it. And I love it. Because the stuff that you bring out, it's kind of sad, man. But, like, the stuff that you bring out is stuff, that's hilarious, and yet totally frowned upon these days in the Marine Corps or the military like, like, it's the kind of it's the comedy stuff that comes out of deployment or whatever, that we can all get away with saying in the field, but like, I'm getting reprimanded at work for being unprofessional for saying things that people like, you're not in the field, you're a post office guy now and like, like, this is not what I you know, so anyway, so all that to say, I just, I enjoy it, because it's the stuff that I enjoy, right? Like, that's, that's the side of the Marine Corps that keeps people in the Marine Corps, like the field and the stupid things that people do. Oh man.

Donny:

The comedy that exists behind closed doors, in the tent. And in a couple of guys sleeping bags next to each other. Like that comedy is my favorite shit.

David:

And you found a way to capture it, and, and live. I mean, not only are you helping tons of people, because you're right, like comedy is great for the soul. And connection is great for the soul. And getting around people is great for you know, but you gotta create your own world like your own. I mean, like, that's, that's cool. You have to follow your vision and build your own thing. And I think that's huge for a lot of people when they get out of the military, right? Like there's this, like transition. I'm not even there yet. But like the transition from like, I'm a marine to I'm a civilian or like, where people lose that identity in the process. And I think like the fact that you were able to build exactly what you wanted to build and that's huge.

Donny:

Thank you. It was, I was like I said, I think um, I don't know if I said I feel like I'm the most fortunate person that I know right? I think about everyone else You know, a lot of people who found immense success and very abusive or neglectful past I did it my past six spot like I had good so incredibly dedicated focus parenting that when I when I look at so many of the guys in my life, that I've become really close with it become part of my family dating back to middle school. It was all kids that didn't have parenting like my brother and I did. So they became a part of our family and are still to this day, so I give it all to my parents straight up..

Alex:

That's fascinating. Yeah, not everybody, not everybody is that lucky. We are that one, that's good though to capitalize on it.

Donny:

It's like what a fucking piece of shit if I didn't do this shit, right? Like what a fucking loser like a wasted all.

David:

Oh, man.

Alright, so somebody's leaving the military right now like what do you think it was you took out of the military that helped make you successful? Like we kind of joked about life coaching earlier on but I'm curious to kind of crack that nut a little bit and hear some Donny O'Malley wisdom on some of the stuff from your journey and what's helped make you successful. What do you think helps veterans when they exit the military? It's really broad..

Donny:

It's a really hard question.

David:

I thought I painted that with as much as you want.

35:00 - 40:00

Donny:

Leaving the military? Oh boy.

Maybe this would be the first time I do this.

David:

Oh oh.

Donny:

First time I've ever done this in my knowledge.

Yeah. If you're getting out, you need to think about what you were like before you went in. Like, what was your personality, like, even if your past was, is neglected, you gotta get to some point in your past, you can remember what you were like, and then decide if you want to be like that again or be a better version of that, combined with the what you learned in the military.

But it starts with developing a vision of exactly what you want your life to be like. And then creating an identity. Because your, your behaviors and your mind, everything follows would you identify us. If you identify as to fucking fat slob. Like you're just always joking around about yeah, I'm fucking fat, you know, you're always joking about it. You're gonna keep being like that your mind is going to it because it's a pattern. So you might have programmed to keep thinking that way. And then you're always going to be that it's like you develop the vision for yourself in that book. And then you become that vision. You have to develop a vision. What do I want to be? Why do I want to be a mechanic? Do I want a white collar job? Do I want to pursue something more artistic? Do I want to do whatever it is to spend as much time as possible with my kids, like, that's my brother. He designed a powerful vision for his life. And it is developing beautiful children.

So everything moves from that. If the job's gonna take too much time from his kids, he's not done. They just have more money, but they have a great life. So the vision is so fucking powerful. And I think guys need to acknowledge that until they develop something like that for themselves. It's going to be really, really hard to wake up and just be fucking stoked every day.

So it's like for those who are not waking up stoked every day. There's a reason why. It's because you haven't at least tried to create a vision of what you want your life to be like. Don't, you know, think about all the reasons why it can't be like that. That fucking pussy shit. Just developed division. just tried to fucking everyone has imagination. Just try and see something cool. Okay, yeah, that looks fine. I could be happy with that. All right, now you see it. Now research how to make that happen. Who else in the world has done it? Someone else has done it. And you'll find the steps of the actual actionable things you can do to achieve that vision. They're all written somewhere on the fucking internet or in a YouTube video.

So all you gotta do is research it. Once you now it's like you have the vision you do the research and it's like okay, well, it's possible it's possible if I do this, this this this so I guess I'm a real fucking piece of shit if I don't.

David:

Dude, I love it. So I'm big on what I say I'm big on it. I've become big on vision, vision boards and vision statements and whatever and just visualizing what I want to be and writing my goals every day. Because I started this whole platform like two and a half years ago. And it kind of just started as a way to document what I was doing. And then it slowly morphed into like, oh, holy crap, I can help people like I can. I can reach people I can talk to. People like this have very quickly become like my purpose or my identity once I leave the military, but the vision for it, like for a while I was just like, all over the place.

And I finally read a book that talked very much about developing a clear vision and, and it's crazy how even with COVID and even with everything going on over the last like not even a year since I wrote all that down. How much of that stuff has happened? Because it's like, like we wrote, I remember writing down in December, like hosting a military real estate investing event conference, and then it happened in May. And it's like, okay, now what so yeah, I'm a huge believer in and you're right, like it's like, just find someone who's been where you want to be and listen to them. And you know, if they've achieved what you want to achieve in life, like, you get close to them. You can't help but succeed.

40:00 - 45:00

Donny:

Yeah.

Just studying it.

Just like you can you there are so many people who you can learn from. And actually, here's something that I would love to share that I don't think I have yet but like you know, if, as soon as you can identify people who can make your life better, just by listening to them, you know that the words that come out of their mouths, even if you don't do it right, then, you know, there's just two things you can gain from watching videos of people who inspire you is, you can gain a better ability to speak, to articulate and communicate, because most successful people, at least successful entrepreneurs, I should say, are very good communicators, I think it's, it's got to be damn near impossible to be a very successful entrepreneur without being a very good communicator. And it all comes down to communicating your vision.

So, so by listening to other people talk it does, it's an amazing thing for your brain to fill your brain with. And then you also hear the stories of their failures and their successes. So you're learning from their mistakes, you can get ahead of your own mistakes. As an entrepreneur, even on any path. If you're trying to be very successful, you have to define successes. But if you want to be that, fuck I lost it. Tell me.

David:

Failures and successes and shortcuts.

Donny:

Oh, failures, if you're gonna fail a million fucking times, like you're gonna make so many mistakes. But you can just keep the number of mistakes down by studying other people and other businesses. And so it's just like, you think about what time you are, you're doing with your time on any given day. It's like, how much time is being wasted, not propelling you towards some goal, right. Because if you can fill your life with enough goals, and every minute of the day to be pushing towards a goal, if that means getting six hours of fucking sleep, like put yourself down, you know, that means smoke a bowl and let your mind rates and fucking stretch and feel euphoric. Like that's actually good for your mind, good for recovery right?

So if everything if you have enough goals then, then everything's intentional. And by listening to these people's videos of successful people speaking, it's just going to fill your mind with goodness and keep you moving forward, avoiding mistakes and moving with speed as well. Because it keeps the motivation up.

So anyways, the short split to condense that is stop watching fucking bullshit televisions and fucking on social media, just fill your mind up with shit that's gonna push you towards your goals.

David:

Except for Vet TV. Obviously,

Donny:

Yeah, that's not bullshit television.

David:

I know, I couldn't, I couldn't resist.

Alex:

I like both those pieces of advice.

So I started doing that a few years ago, I started manifesting my goals just because I would write them down. And I never considered myself an ambitious person. I still don't feel right, but I say see exactly that face.

What's that?

Donny:

It’s nonsense

Alex:

And I say, Well, I have these goals. And then I look up how to do it. And what I find is, I find my ambition along the way. Because it's like, oh, if you get a little bit you make a little progress. And I'm like, oh, man, you know, I wish I could do more if I set my goals a little higher. So I love that you know, decide what you want to be, start researching it. A little progress starts giving you a mentum and then you get some stones about it.

Donny:

Yeah, yeah, you can train your brain to like get a little hit of dopamine.

So now you're just like chasing his dopamine all day long, because you design your fucking day like that. And it's just like, oh, yeah, tomorrow, I just want to learn about DSLR cameras. Like I want to walk away from tomorrow, just knowing what camera to fucking purchase. And you could be spent eight hours googling, watching fucking YouTube videos of different DSLR cameras and thinking about what cameras is going to be the best for what you're trying to do. And through that research, by the end of the day, you'd be like, oh, it's this is definitely the one for pricing and all those things that I need, and then bam, shot a dope, you're excited to get that fucking camera because you know, that's the exact one that you want. that's a that's a little when you just ride that shit.

Alex:

What cameras do you use to shoot on Vet TV?

Donny:

Ah Ari mini has been the main one shot most of our stuff. Couple Reds black magic right now. We're shooting this week right now. We're in production right now.

Alex:

Nice!

Donny:

Yeah.

Alex:

Just curious.

David:

Alex is a bit of a camera nerd.

Donny:

So you get it. You're researching cameras, it's fun.

45:00 - 50:00

David:

And that's a much better dopamine hit than like, you know, cheesecake, which is a lot of people stoked I'm, I am jealous of the brownie and ice cream dopamine hit from time to time but or guilty, but but you know, I mean, there's a lot of really bad dopamine fixes that people get hooked on and learning is definitely one that's worth training yourself to like.

Donny:

Yes.

So I do have. Let's see, I got one or two other questions on here. I guess one, Rio asked, what organizations are you partnered with? Or will you in the future to help raise awareness with Reverend warriors or vet TV?

Donny:

Um, okay, so Vet TV does probably the bulk load of the marketing for Reverend warriors, by having it on our email list and on our social media. And we, we've never taken a dime from reverend warriors as policy we won't.

But we do their marketing. And the community is the same. It's the same people I go to when I go to a city site, about not a majority, but a lot of people they're big Vet TV fans, and even if they're not subscribed, now, they've probably been subscribed at some point. And it's a cool thing to talk about the show's and shit so Vet TV will market them and our specific partner with the Reverend warriors is run style run style actually just came on board as a spoken suggest partner for reverend warriors. They're going to do a lot of reverend warriors marketing and, and also run styles, in Vet TV we have we have a bunch of media partnerships going on, but we're actually producing one of their shows called tun tavern. It's a fucking it's like cheers, but for tun tavern.

David:

Love it.

Donny:

And yeah, it'll be you know, that's two weeks, two weeks we shoot that with one style. So that screen size is a specific new partner. We've been partnered with black rifles and even nine lines and a handful of veteran brands come over. Rule your ass off. TCO, Kill Cliff. So.

David:

What's your prediction is the October Oceanside souci hike still going to be able to happen?

Donny:

I, all the planning is going full speed ahead.

David:

Alright.

Donny:

As far as I know, so.

David:

I mean, I figure if I can cycle down those trails and run on those trails without a mask on right now then. Theoretically, if you were to do like, like outside seems to be fair game. I mean, you can eat in the Denny's parking lot but not inside. So you should be able to...

Donny:

We are still doing it all over the country. But uh I don't think we've done it in California.

So California is a different beast.

David:

Yep.

Donny:

That should go.

David:

Two or three questions that I ask every guess.

Donny:

Yes, sir.

David:

Um, so the first one I ask is, if a 18 to 19 year old or an E one e two was to walk up to you asking you for life advice, right? A lot of times I gear this towards real estate investing, but obviously, it's not quite applicable here.

So if somebody was to walk up to you just asking you like, just advice for life in general as an E one e two. What would you like the one thing that you feel they need to know?

Donny:

There's so much they're so fucking young and stupid.

Alex:

Helpless.

David:

Yeah. Hey, but they're gonna listen to the show. And that's that they're here to become less young and well, less stupid. Anyway, I don't know.

Donny:

Yeah, I guess I guess any 18-19 year olds who's listening to military to millionaire military to Millionaire? Like, you know, that fucking kid's gonna be successful.

He's 19

Yes, that guy's gonna be good.

David:

You'd be surprised we get some. I actually get quite a few people who are listening to stuff. They haven't even gone to boot camp yet, which is really interesting to me. And that's like my target, right? Like, if I can get a hold of someone before they go to boot camp and be like, just understand like this one thing about not buying a new car that has 20% interest like life changed.

50:00 - 57:28

Donny:

Yeah. Um, oh, don't, look. I don't know if this should be my one thing because it's already said so many times, but do not get married in a wrong person.

No.

Literally, it's, it means you're Maura. Because you're too stupid to know that you don't even know who you are as a person. But you don't know yet. You're not going to know so fucking 30 so you should probably like, give it some time to know yourself better. Before you commit to someone for the rest of your life every day. The rest of your life. What are you doing, bro?

David:

Oh man.

I can agree with that, to I mean, to an extent I'm sure there's you know, extenuating circumstances.

But I think yeah, actually I've written a few articles where I say one of the biggest financial mistakes people make is getting married to the wrong person. Oh, it's just...

Donny:

I'd say mentally one of these mental health mistakes.

Alex:

Yeah, oh, boy. What's the number one cause of divorce in the United States?

Marriage.

No, good.

David:

Oh, man.

All right. So the next question is, uh, what is one resource, whether it's a book, of course, a website, or I don't know, just a person that you would recommend to anyone looking into, whether it's finances, entrepreneurship, business, you know, whatever?

Donny:

Impacts theory.

David:

You’re the first, I'm a fan.

Alex:

What is it? I don't know what it is.

Donny:

So, Tom, this fucking guy is incredible. It was kind of, he never considered himself anything special for the majority of his life, which is a lot of why I relate to him.

And he ended up starting a company without first off, he tried to be a filmmaker, failed, and then failed a couple of businesses and then started a company called Quest Nutrition. That sold for like $4 billion in, I want to say between six to 10 years, which is a pretty fast turnaround, to hit that many billions, or even a billion period.

You know that means it's an explosive product. And it was so he got stupid, stupid, stupid, rich, I mean, stupid. And after this, the company sold. And he started this program called Impact Theory, which is intended to introduce people to the tools and mindsets and techniques to actually analyze your dreams.

And so he interviews incredible guests, and they talk about the ways in which the majority of them anyway, the ways in which they have been able to find success, and or they talk about mindset. And then he does a lot of research into brain science to understand exactly what is going on in the brain. In this big ball of fucking bush. It's just loaded with fucking billions of electrical pathways, right? Like, what is going on in there.

And so they introduce you to people who will help you understand that. And I would attribute a large amount of my own good mental health success to that show, the people that I was introduced to through that show.

David:

Yeah, I watched the Impact Theory YouTube stuff quite often and get that I'm a fan.

He's a smart dude. And I can't remember the name of his wife, but she's pretty solid, too. Like they're just stand up people.

Donny:

Yeah, yeah, they, they are better off at their house. And it gets to be Tom. But they even just tell them they're there, they're good people.

David:

Yep.

Donny:

Genuine people.

David:

That's cool.

All right. So the last question that I always ask everyone is, where can people get a hold of you? But I feel like that should be pretty self evident, but I'm gonna let you plug it anyway.

Donny:

I'm gonna say you don't.

David:

Okay.

Just go to vet TV and you can watch him.

Donny:

They get old to me. Leave a comment on an episode of veteran television.

David:

There you go.

Donny:

That's how you, that's the best way to reach out to me. Oh my god. I want to make that a thing. It can't be the first episode because the first episode was free on the app. Skyping some other episodes. Hey, you told me to reach out to you by commenting on better television. That's how I know you subscribed. And yeah, that's it.

It's gonna be so funny.

Alex:

David, we can't hear you.

Donny:

Yeah, your mic just gave up.

David:

Did it go away completely?

Donny:

No. Little bit.

Alex:

Yeah. Yeah, so David's real new with this. He, uh he's been having operator malfunctions the last week or so.

David:

Oh, I don't know. I don't know what happened.

Alex:

It sounds like I'm gonna run the show out.

David:

Is it going out again?

Donny:

Just really low.

David:

Can you hear me now?

Donny:

That's better.

David:

Alright. I don't. It's like my game goes down, even though it's not like that's what it was earlier. I had to turn the game back up. But last night, it completely shut off. And I had to switch to my webcam mic.

Donny:

Oh, no.

Alex:

Isn't this the most expensive equipment you bought or treated yourself?

David:

It works when you're not on the episode. I blame you.

Donny:

Yeah.

Oh man, Donny, hey, we really appreciate this. This has been a lot of fun. There's been a lot of really, really good information in here.

I really like your viewpoints on vision and just following people that have already achieved what you want in life. And I think Impact Theory is a great resource.

So thank you so much for giving us a little bit of your time. And I just want to say thank you and how much we appreciate you as the military millionaire community but also just servicemembers and vets in general man, I mean, you're doing a great thing for the community of everyone right? And that's, that's awesome. We appreciate it.

Donny:

Thank you very much.

Me and all of my friends and my teammates try very very hard to keep you guys laughing. Sometimes we miss our boat we're fucking Tron festival.

End:

Thank you for listening to another episode about my journey From military to millionaire.
If you liked it, be sure to visit Frommilitarytomillionaire.com/podcast to subscribe to future podcasts. While you're there, we'd love for you to rate the show. Give us a review on iTunes. Now get out there and take action

 

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Donny O'Malley quote about vision

Donny O’Malley Show Notes

Episode: 110

Donny O’Malley

Join David Pere and Alexander Felice with Donny O’Malley as they talk about Donny’s journey from being an infantry officer to successfully running his own TV production company.

He is the author of the book, “Embarrassing Confessions of a Marine Lieutenant” and the main man behind VET Tv

VET Tv is available online at https://www.veterantv.tv/ and via streaming apps on Apple, Google Play, Roku, and Xbox.

He is also the founder of Irreverent Warriors, a nonprofit foundation that brings veterans together through events, support networks, and creative engagements to improve their mental health and prevent veteran suicide.

Donny lets us in on his vision to build a veteran community through comedy and camaraderie. He shares how he became an advocate for suicide prevention and mental health improvement and his mission to use humor to make a difference in the lives of others.

Get ready to laugh and learn with Donny, so stay tuned!

About Donny O’Malley:

Mr. Donny O’Malley was born in Queens, New York, and raised by Colombian and Irish immigrants.  He joined the Marine Corps in 2009 and became an infantry officer.  During his time in the Marine Corps, Mr. O’Malley was deployed once to Southeast Asia and Afghanistan. Thanks to generally weak bone structure and chronic sand in his lady parts, he was medically retired in 2015. Donny went on to dedicate his post-service life to making military veterans laugh and build community through comedy.

Outline of the Episode:

  • [05:27] Entering the Marine Corps and becoming an infantry officer
  • [06:41] Retiring due to medical reasons, then pursuing his dream of starting a production company
  • [08:28] How the death of his friend motivated him to advocate for suicide prevention through Irreverent Warriors
  • [13:36] From one viral video to a full-fledged production!
  • [18:10] A funny story about Donny’s website
  • [23:16] The logistics and challenges behind a full TV production
  • [26:28] Growing their company by bringing in people to help level up their game
  • [29:07] What’s instore for VET TV moving forward?
  • [35:00] Developing a vision and creating your identity post-service life.
  • [39:44] Learning from other people’s successes and failures and choosing to fill your mind with valuable content.
  • [43:25] How to train your brain to get a little hit of dopamine?
  • [49:28] What you need to know when you’re 18 or 19 years old? Practical life lessons from David & Donny!

Advice to an 18-20-year old:

Don’t get married during your first enlistment!

Resources:

Follow our journey!

Sponsor:

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My name is David Pere, I am an active duty Marine, and have realized that service members and the working class use the phrase “I don’t get paid enough” entirely too often. The reality is that most often our financial situation is self-inflicted. After having success with real estate investing, I started From Military to Millionaire to teach personal finance and real estate investing to service members and the working class. As a result, I have helped many of my readers increase their savings gap, and increase their chances of achieving financial freedom! – Click here to SUBSCRIBE: https://bit.ly/2Q3EvfE to the channel for more awesome videos!

THIS SITE IS INDEPENDENTLY OWNED AND OPERATED. ALL OPINIONS EXPRESSED HEREIN ARE MY OWN. THE VIEWS EXPRESSED ON THIS SITE ARE THOSE OF THE AUTHOR OR THE AUTHOR’S INVITED GUEST POSTERS, AND MAY NOT REFLECT THE VIEWS OF THE US GOVERNMENT, THE DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE, OR THE UNITED STATES MARINE CORPS.

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David Pere

David Pere

David is an active duty Marine, who devotes his free time to teaching personal finance and real estate investing for service members, and the working class!

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