Episode 39 | Michael Zuber | Military Millionaire Podcast

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Michael Zuber on The Military Millionaire Podcast

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Hey, what's up military millionaires. Today I have an exciting episode with Michael Zuber, the author of One Rental of a Time where we talk about how to get out of the rat race even if you live somewhere as expensive as Silicon Valley and work in a crazy tech job.

If this is your first time joining us welcome to the community. If not, thanks for coming back.

Hey guys, check out the podcast notes at Frommilitarytomillionaire.com/podcasts. Now relax and enjoy the show.

Intro:

You're listening to the military millionaire podcast, a show about real estate investing for the working class. Stay tuned as we explore ways to help you improve your finances, build wealth through real estate and become a person that is worth knowing.

Sponsor:

Hold onto your seats guys. we'll kick this off after a word from our sponsors.

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David:

Hey, what's up everybody? I am here today with Michael Zuber who was a full time employee for 15 years and then exited the rat race due to buying one rental at a time.

So Michael, I'd love for you to tell us a little bit about yourself. Welcome to the show, brother.

Michael:

Hey, David, thank you very much. Great to be here.

Yeah, as you said, You know, I was a full time tech worker. So I live in the Silicon Valley. And you know what the story starts on my 30th birthday. Actually, I wake up on my 30th birthday. You know, I've, you know, I've been successful, at least by the way my parents raised me right, I went to you know, I graduated high school. I couldn't, I had to pay for my own college. So I went to a junior college. And then I went to a university and graduated, got a job, started climbing the corporate ladder, and then went back and got an MBA in the evenings, which thankfully my employer paid for. And then I get to my 30th birthday, and I have nothing to show for it or nearly nothing right. I've wasted every penny as my income went up, my spending went up.

And that's when the Rich Dad Poor Dad book kind of smacked me across the face and introduced the concept of the rat race. You know, I didn't know I was in a rat race, I was sort of raised that that was the only way to go. You know, my mother and father were both in the military dads marine mom was in the Navy. And you know, that was that was it right? It was like, you're going to school, and then you're going to a good, good job, and you're gonna climb the corporate ladder and you're going to be successful. That's what I mean, literally beaten into me growing up.

05:00 - 10:00

Michael:

And so I got to my 30th birthday, and I sort of looked up and I went, something's wrong, right, especially after reading that book, which I read five times in a row. And the answer was cash flow, you know, more specifically buy and hold rentals. So I did that. And like you said in the intro, I did that for 15 years. You know, there's there's lots of ups and downs in a market that, you know, I started before the crash invested up through it, survived it and kept going, but ultimately left with the portfolio that paid for my, you know, my daily bills, just like the book talked about. And you know, I retired February 1st of 18. So over 14 months ago, my wife's been out for five years. And, you know, we can't live extravagantly. We're not going to look good on social media with all the stupid Ferraris and you know, you know, private jets and all of that. But you know what we can do, we can go to dinners and you know, we could, you know lounge around and go to the gym and life is good, right? We didn't know if it would work out. But thankfully, one rental at a time works. When you buy it, hold it conservatively and finance the keys of living below your means. That's what I would tell a younger self. As you know, this Social Media Day is really injuring our futures when we try to keep up with people we either don't like or even worse, don't know.

You know, you're setting yourself up. And, you know, I wish I would have heard and read that book when I was 20. You know, I would have saved 10 years and been out of the rat race even earlier, but thankfully made it and now I spend my time, you know, speak with guys like you and trying to give back and, you know, every show, I can help one person so like, you know, I feel like I've been successful.

David:

Absolutely.

And you're absolutely right about In fact, I almost made, I decided not to, because I figured that the blowback would probably be worse than the juice, I'd get out of squeezing it. But I almost made this video about rap culture. And basically just like, why rap is making you poor, because their videos are the worst when it comes to the, you know, they'd rather look rich, rather than be rich. All of their stuff is just like, how much money can I blow on this music video, right.

But that whole social media mentality. In fact, I'll see these upcoming superstars on social media and I have to ask myself, okay, did you really make it? Or is he leasing that car for these videos? Like is he you know, who knows, you can't even tell. And it's, it's scary because people are. So I'm a command financial specialist for my unit. And I will sit down with Marines and I'll talk to them about their finances, and I'll get the stories about how they don't have enough money and they don't do this. They don't make enough money. And this then the other and you're peeling back finances, you're like, you got $600 for the shoes, an Xbox. And you know, whatever. And I'm like, and they just, oh, well, yeah, but no, no buts like that. I get it. Someone else had it. But you didn't need three pairs of Jordans this week.

Michael:

Yeah.

Well, I mean, I, you know, Gary Vee kind of says it pretty succinctly now. 98% of us by dumb, blank, right. And to keep up with people we don't know or don't like, and don't respect and, and, you know, as someone who spent his 30s doing that, and had had some nice toys, I can tell you, it's not worth it.

The rat race is real, the wheel gets bigger, it gets heavier as you add. As your income goes up, if your expenses go up, and your family commitment goes up, and pretty soon, you know what something I would tell my younger self again, is, do yourself a favor and look up in your organization, whether it be military or corporate, maybe three or four rungs and go do I want their life. Now I cannot speak about the military at all. But I can tell you in the corporate world, four rungs above me when I was 30, were overweight, unhealthy, addicted to a foreign substance. And I never wanted my body.

And on their second or maybe third marriage probably had a mistress or whatever the reverses of a man. I don't, Mister, I don't know, whatever it is, because it was both sexes. I'm not trying to be sexist. But both were doing things that I just didn't want in my life. And yeah, you could tell yourself that won't be you and all of that. But when you work in a culture that is 90 day cycles, high pressure, you know, million dollar deals all the time, and you're traveling all the time, you're away from home for 150 days, you could see how it could happen. And I want none of that, frankly, I want to get away from that. But it paid well.

So I buckled down, made as much money as I could, we went from living like 98 to 102% of our income to like, less than 50. And some years less than 40% of our income. That's where the magic happens. That's when the rat race slows down. It's where you can start making decisions. And you could change your future. But when you live that close to the edge, especially as we head into a changing business cycle, man Oh, so people are going to be just crushed. And that's that's unfortunate.

David:

It is.

Yeah. Luckily for the military the weight and the illegal substance stuff is kind of kind of you get you get kind of ousted, so most of them don't, don't do that. But there's definitely some high levels of stress and depending on your job, you know, the time requirement gets longer and so I can see exactly where you're coming from, you know, you see both sides of the spectrum. I've seen guys who were way up the ladder that love their life, and I see guys are way up the ladder and you're like, man, I don't want to be at the office that late ever.

Michael:

Yeah.

David:

It just kinda depends.

Michael

Well, that's, that's really cool that you have somebody that you can look at and go yeah, that's that he or she is happy. I saw zero of that. And now again, this is you know, if the sample size wasn't huge, it was probably dozens of people, because I was looking that far up and I was just an individual contributor, you know, the lowest of low levels. But I'm like, Dude, don't give me any of that. I'm gonna keep cranking until the end of contributor you know, do my thing and you know, eat what I kill and get out. Right. And you know, 15 years later it happened.

10:00 - 15:00
David:

That's awesome.

All right, so you decided to exit the rat race? Could you explain briefly what, like the one rental at a time strategies that allowed you to do that?

Michael:

Yeah.

So I wish I could tell you it was a big plan I came up with on my 30th birthday. It's not I basically started sacrificing living below my means, always conservatively financed it, that's what saved us during the O 8, a crash.

What really saved us is we were trying to buy our ninth property. It was O 8 and if you remember, O 8 at all, it was right near the peak of the market where prices were silly. But for us, I didn't know that I, you know, I was traveling around the world and buying these, you know, at 4am. And, you know, 11 o'clock at night. That's, that's all the time I had. But, you know, that night house I was looking at was going for 260. And it was renting for 1100.

Why that's important is because my first house I bought for 100 was renting for 1100. Right? So add 160 grand to that. And it just didn't make financial sense, right? There were these ridiculous liar loans and two and 28 and things where you could kind of do really bad Excel math and make it look okay?

David;

Yeah.

Michael:

But as a finance person, I'm like, that's gonna blow up. Right? That's, that's just not okay.

So long story short, we did what you should do in the real estate, network, meet more people. And we got introduced to small multi families in commercial space. So that's five units to 20 units. So what we did is in what saved us is we took that first house that had all that gain in it. And we did what's called a 10-31. Exchange, we sold it for roughly 260, we moved all of that equity into a five unit building, which was, you know, cheaper. And, but it rented for 3 x.

So I mean, I mean, rents for 3x. $40,000, cheaper, you know, pretty good news.

David:

Yeah.

Michael:

So I'm a simple man, if, if some is good, more is better. So we did that with all those first eight properties we bought. In about a year period, maybe 15 months, we went from 8 to 80.

David:

Wow.

Michael:

And that's all the one rental at a time, no new capital, all equity transfer or 10-31 exchanges. Then the crash happens. And, you know, suddenly, we tried to go back and buy houses again. And we find out that the banks don't like us. We have 800 credit scores, we have six figure incomes, we have seven figure net worth and never missed a payment. But banks won't lend to us. And because the crash, right? We're real estate investors, we caused it the word on the street?

David:

It wasn't the poor guy buying a home, he had no business buying with a 580 credit score.

Michael:

Yeah, well, that's what the bank said, right. And then it was, I didn't know what to do. I was like, Oh, my God, what's what's going on. So at the end of the day, you know, when Lehman Brothers blows up, and you know, savings rates go below 1%, and basically weak to net it out, we start borrowing private money, and we pay 10%, to friends and family, we get a note, deed of trust, recorded, named on insurance, do everything legit. But we ended up buying 50 or 60 units during the crash on top of the others, you know, then the hedge funds come into the world suddenly different when they buy stuff sight unseen, because it got so ridiculously cheap.

And then the market returns. It enters the seller's market that we've been in for the last, I don't know, six, seven years and, you know, is really good. And, you know, obviously rents go up and mortgage pay downs and all these great things happen when you let time I tell people when you're buying hold or one rental at a time, you should think in decades, conservatively, finance upfront and then think in decades, this is not a you know, it's not flipping, it's not wholesaling, you're not talking weeks or months, I want to do my day job, I want to be the very, very best at my day job, I want to make as much money as I can in my day job, and I'm gonna have this be my, my future.

What happens is we get, I get to my 45th birthday, I love my job, love, love, love my job. You know, as stuff happens, I get in sales, you get transferred around higher quotas, new people all the time. And I was put into a relationship that was not going to last long. And I had all this behind me. And I was to the state where I told people all the time what I thought and I let this individual know that I thought they were toxic, and not a very good person. And that's probably what you should tell your boss. And, you know, we pretty much came to a mutual decision that this was not going to work. And I agreed and we you know, we put a quick package together and I was out that day because of one rental at a time and and you know, I'm so happy to have it because if I didn't have this I would have had to work with someone I can't respect and that probably would have killed me. Probably.

David:

I like that.

So it's funny because as you grow and on the outside of your job it does become almost like it gives you permission to speak what's on your mind. Which you know, as you say, backfires. The nice thing about my job is as long as you're tactful about it. You can bring things up to people and generally speaking, obviously, there's exceptions. But generally speaking in the Marine Corps or the military community, the thick skin and the community allows for you to be like, Hey, man, you're being a jerk. And I'd love to talk to you about better or better ways you could do this. And they're like, okay, you know, obviously, there's some crappy leaders, but man, I've seen some pretty crazy conversations where I've brought something up, and they're like, Oh, well, cool. Let's talk about it. And I'm like, that was gonna go way worse for me.

15:00 - 20:00

Michael:

Yeah, that went left when I expected to go right.

David:

Yeah. So it's kind of cool.

Michael:

Awesome.

David:

I missed that when I get out and I have to, like, tread over feelings.

Michael:

Yeah, that's, I'm not yeah.

And you're right. When you do build a plan, and you let time and that little trickle of cash flow grows into something that ultimately becomes substantial enough. You can be you. And, you know, I had traditionally, you know, if you knew anybody from my background, I'd always say that Zuber speaks his mind, it just got a lot crisper in communication. As time went on, I used to be politically correct and soft, and, you know, tap dance around it and get the point across. And now it's like, okay, you're an idiot. I think you're, yeah, I think you're poisoned. I just can't work for you. So you know, what are we going to do? So that's probably how that went. So, okay.

David:

That's awesome.

So 10-31 exchange bigger properties, are you still in Silicon Valley?

Michael:

I live in Silicon Valley, but I invest in Fresno, which is about two and a half hours away. The Silicon Valley doesn't make sense for rentals or cash flow in the seller's market, you can make a killing and flip when the market turns, you're going to get crushed. So I didn't play there. But I've always been in Fresno, I have a saying live where you want but invest where the numbers make sense.

So Fresno was the first market for me that made sense, I had to be able to drive there and go see it. I didn't want to get on an airplane. That's more about me than the environment. I know. There's lots of great states and providers out there that can help out estate investing. But as a Type A individual, and a control freak. I needed to go see my stuff in a car, right? So that's what I did.

David:

It's taken some time for me to get used to not being able to go drive by my properties. But I've been a blessing in disguise. Because I've been forced to trust my manager so much.

But I only asked that, because I wanted to just reiterate to people that depending on market cycles and how you buy, even California, and it's ridiculous real estate prices can be a very successful place to invest. And that's I think the trick because there's this mentality in the military of buy everywhere you get stationed I'm like, No, no, no, no, no, no, no buy stations. Sure if the markets right and the timings right, but you know, if you had bought everywhere you got station and you bought houses in 2004, six and eight in San Diego, you'd be in a different situation if you because you know, a lot of them do the zero leverage VA loan, which is awesome. Unless you buy an O 8, zero leverage, or zero down and now more detects.

But I just like the fact that you did that, I'm familiar with the Fresno market. I was born in Santa Rosa.

Michael:

Oh, yeah. Okay.

David:

I mean, I didn't grow up there. But I spent plenty of time up there as a kid. And yeah, so to be able to successfully invest in markets like that, you know, there's not much you wouldn't be able to do provided you catch it on the right swing. So that's cool.

Michael:

You got it.

David:

Awesome, awesome.

Well, I got a couple of questions for you that I like to ask everyone. One of them is if an 18 to 20 year old walked up, you know, ask them for advice, and you only had a few minutes to give it to them? What would be the advice you'd want to tell?

Michael:

Well, I think the first one we hit on already, I would tell them, as tactfully as I could, he or she right? I would tell you the key to lead I guess, this is probably how I would walk it with them.

I would say what do you want in life? Right? Do you want to have freedom of time and choice? And decision making? Right? And I would really make sure they understood that? And if the answer is no, I want to be a colonel or a two star general or, you know, that was their vision and dream and you know, go for it.

But if the answer is I want to be able to do what I want with whom I want whenever I want, right? That's kind of the answer or those kinds of words, I would say okay, I'm gonna tell you something you're not gonna like.

The number one way to get there is to live on less than you make. And if you can live on, you know, 50% or less than what you make your chances of being free in 10 to 20 years is awesome. However, if you go out and buy a truck, or a Mustang or buy a, you know, Ninja motorcycle, or whatever the things are of the day, or the Jordans or iPhones or whatever it are, to keep up with someone because you have to have it and you want to reward yourself with stuff. You're not going to get there. You need to get very good at understanding need versus want, right and you need a lot less than you want. You should earn the very, very best at what you do as you're working right that people are paying you, and you should save and invest and then repeat.

20:00 - 25:00

Michael:

And if you do that, and you know, you'll be able to be free, I'm living proof. You know, I exited a six figure job in 15 years, because my monthly is covered. And it's awesome. I can promise you, it's worth it. But it starts by sacrifice. And most people don't want to hear that when you're 18, you're thinking about the new car and the new truck or the whatever it is, I'm going to tell you not to buy it, and you're gonna hate me for it, you're gonna you're gonna create excuses why you can have it and blah, blah, blah, but I'm going to tell you, you know that that $20,000 truck or whatever it is, is going to make you work an extra five or six years. So is it worth it? And how bad do you want freedom? You tell me? That's probably where I'd go.

David:

Awesome.

Yeah, that's huge. And you're right. In fact, it's funny, I did this budgeting class like a year ago, and I thought I was so good at saving money. And I go through the budgeting class. And I was like, Huh, saving, like 25% of my income, like, it’s not terrible.

Michael:

Better than most.

David:

Yeah. But I started looking at my budget a little bit more intensely. And I was like man Let's cut that out and that out. And now I'm, I don't, I don't remember the exact percent right now, because I got my stuff changed around. But between 45 and 55%.

Michael:

That's respect. I mean, when you think about the American culture, of consumerism, and social media and instant gratification, I don't know what the number is. But I would bet you there's less than 5% of the average Americans save 50% of what they earn. It's probably less than 3%.

David:

Yeah. And the cool thing is when you factor in that 45 to 55% of your income that you're saving, if you don't factor in the rental income. So that's..

Michael:

Yeah!

David:

I think about that. And I'm like, yeah, I'm saving 45% of my income. And then I'm like, Oh, yeah, except if you count, you know, get paid out in cash flow, probably closer to 80%. But we'll leave that alone.

Michael:

Yeah, keep that behind your back.

David:

Yeah.

Michael:

But it is good. Yes.

David:

Yeah, it's awesome. Um, what is something that you wish you had been taught earlier on about finances in general? I guess that probably ties into what you just said. But maybe there's some other trick of the..

Michael:

Yeah, well, I guess, again, I think it's in my book somewhere because my mother called me on it, which is really funny, because she read the book, I'm like, Mom, I would have given you the book. But she said, I said something like, so I would get dropped off at grade school by my mother, she was a stay at home mom, after my younger sister was born. And she would say something like this, Michael, now your job is to go to school, get a good education. So you can get a good job and make a lot of money and buy pretty presents, kind of that stain.

I didn't know it at the time. But that's the definition of the rat race. I wish she would have said something like Michael your jobs, go to school, get a good education, you know, learn as much as you can, and then save or something to that extent. My family. Again, I'm the only college graduate with a master's degree in my entire family, both father and mother's side. I mean, all sides, cousins, aunts, uncles, nieces, nephews, all of them. And they're all you know, just you know, living paycheck to paycheck. It's money or wealth was never talked about. I wish it was and I don't blame my parents. They didn't know their parents didn't raise them. Neither one of their parents graduated high school and only one of them graduated junior high. Right?

So it's, it's, that's what I wish would have happened. I wasn't around entrepreneurs. I wasn't around investors. I didn't even know what they were. Right. I remember when I had that conversation about multifamily. That guy came up to me and said, Have you ever thought about commercials because I voiced my frustration about houses being too expensive?

In my answer to him was such idiotic and just shows I didn't know but was I don't want office buildings or retail space. He's like, oh, he puts his hand on my shoulder and taps me goes oh that's real. That's cute. Because I didn't know right? Nobody ever talked to me. I didn't think you know, little over a week, buying an apartment building. And, you know, I wish I wish I would have had those conversations. I wish, you know, I think Rich Dad Poor Dad should be taught when or read when you're 13 or something.

Just because it is, it's a different mindset. I mean that I literally read it five times cover to cover over and over. Like, I thought I missed something. I was like, This can't be right, right. What the heck is going on? I've never heard these things before. So that’s what I wished.

David:

What do they say when the student is ready, the teacher will appear.

So my mom swears up and down that she tried to get me to read Rich Dad, Poor Dad in high school, and I don't even remember that which I'm sure she's right. I probably was like, Whoop! But, you know, I think the same thing. I was 25 when someone handed me the book, and it changed my life. And I'm like, Man, I wish I'd read this sooner. And I was talking about it once and she's like, I tried to give you that book and make you, I was homeschooled. She's like, I tried to make you read that book. You never read it. It was homework. And you know, I'm like, Yeah. Like, I totally had an opportunity. So I don't remember that at all. But you know, it's probably accurate.

Michael:

Mom was right, who knows?

25:00 - 30:00

David:

Yeah. So I guess maybe it doesn't, I don't know. But you know, then again, even if only 5% of people took to it when they were 13, imagine what those 5% can do.

Michael:

Can you imagine? What would have happened if I'd started even at 18? When can you legally sign contracts? That's 12 years before? I mean, I could have been done in my 30s instead of my mid 40s. I mean, oh, would have been life would have been so different, had been awesome.

David:

Yeah. And there's and the cool thing is, there's so many methods, I had a guy, I'm not gonna get too crazy into a story, but a guy on the podcast a couple weeks ago, who's still in school, he's at a military academy. He's still in school, and has, you know, college amounts of income, right? So no money. And he's found a way adding value to get in as a general partner on syndications by being an analysis guy, and so this kid is, you know, 22, maybe 21 and has not huge portions, but percentage ownership in you know, two 300 units without a penny out of pocket. I'm like that, that is genius, you are going to be somewhere in 10 years.

Michael:

Exactly. Good for him.

David:

Yeah, it's cool. All right. So uh, well, I kind of I already asked that question. So what is one resource, book, course, website that you would recommend for anyone starting to look into real estate investing?

Michael:

Well, there's, you know, there's the kind of standard answers the whole BiggerPockets is a platform that I've been a part of, since I think it was O 7 or O 8 when Josh was by himself kind of doing his thing. Josh Dorkin, the CEO, that's probably the best place to go, you can always do the YouTube University, right, I have my channel where I try to put daily stuff out.

But when you should go to that's not talked about a lot is the US Census. Because one of the things you should be thinking about is watching migration trends. And more specifically, migration trends of the younger generation, right, the older folks, which I throw myself into, you know, the curve, they're kind of going to all the warm states, but at least my research is pointing to the center of the country becoming a magnet. And that that could be generational wealth created, if it does happen in occur, and you get in early, because prices, generally speaking, are cheaper in the center of the US. And if the population continues to migrate there, and jobs will come and you know, manufacturing comes back and all of that, if you pick the right markets, you could get some, you know, a pretty healthy gain.

So I would say the one that probably isn't highlighted enough is the census. And now obviously, it's a little outdated and all of that, but don't wrap yourself in that just just they deprive gobs of information about where people are and where people are growing. And what's the net migration Up, down? It's an indicator for sure.

David:

Yeah. And that's, that's actually really solid advice.

When people ask me where they should invest. The two things I tell them are, look for there to be at least three different industries for the economy, and look for at least a 1% population growth every year for the last three years. But, you know, the more the merrier. But if you have those two things, at least, you're not gonna fall on your face too fast.

Michael:

Yeah, no, you, I, I have a philosophy I've run with my entire life. My job is to control the downside. That's all I think about and then I'll let the upside take care of itself. So you're, you're, you're doing that right, I'm going to control the downside the best I can, because that's what I can work for. And then, you know, then I then let the chips go where they go.

David:

And the nice thing about the Midwest, where you're talking about is that like you said, the purchase prices are so low that you know, at least your exposure is minimal, comparatively.

Michael:

Absolute dollars, for sure.

David:

Yeah. For now, who knows?

Michael:

Yeah.

David:

I would not complain if all of a sudden, you know, my real estate, like tripled in value, but..

Michael:

That'd be okay with you?

David:

Yeah, but you know, but then again, I'd run into a whole bunch other issues, like buying power going down. So it all just depends.

Michael:

There you go.

David:

That's awesome.

Well, Michael, before we wrap this up, is anything you'd like to add any parting thoughts or big ideas?

Michael:

No, I would tell you this much. If you're interested in understanding what one investor did through a complete real estate cycle. That's why I wrote the book One Rental at a Time, I wrote it in a way that hopefully will be valuable for decades to come. Because real estate cycles are real. And you could do different things at tops and bottoms. So that's, that's what that book is because I never found a book that was written by a busy professional, right?

I worked 60 hours a week minimum traveled all over the world on top of that, for my job. So I wrote the book for that person. And you know, if you have any interest in that, if that's you, I suggest getting the book. It's a measly 15 bucks on Amazon.

And then if you're looking for additional content, I do daily videos on my YouTube channel by the same name One Rental at a Time. And, you know, feel free to subscribe and, you know, let me know if you have any questions. I interviewed David probably, what, four months ago?

David:

Right before where I went and froze.

30:00 - 31:26

Michael:

Yeah, before my investor series so lots of successful investors have been gracious enough to come on and share their experience. So lots of great content is already there and more coming every day. So.

David:

Awesome. Well, is there anywhere else that someone, if they wanted to reach out? How could they get a hold of you?

Michael:

So YouTube I put my email out there all the time. I'll just leave it here as well. It's [email protected] What you could do on YouTube is just leave a comment. I'm a one man show no virtual assistants no nothing else. I do this because I have fun.

So subscribers, if you leave a question, I will create a subscriber question video likely to answer your question. I like to interact with my subscribers. So that's another way to get a hold of me. And then of course, everybody has a website, find one page. It's called onerentalatatimeshocking.com.

So yeah, onerentalatatime.com, drop the shocking. Everything I do is one rental at a time.

David:

That's awesome.

Michael:

Yeah.

David:

Michael, thanks for joining us today. It's been an absolute pleasure. I really appreciate talking to you. So I look forward to keeping this up. When I moved to California one of these days. I'm gonna have to come up and hang out.

Michael:

There you go, brother. Take care of yourself. Travel safe, be well.

David:

Awesome. You too..

End:

Thank you for listening to another episode about my journey From military to millionaire. If you liked it, be sure to visit Frommilitarytomillionaire.com/podcast to subscribe to future podcasts. While you're there, we'd love for you to rate the show. Give us a review on iTunes. Now get out there and take action.

Episode 39:

Michael Zuber

Michael Zuber is a retired tech-guru from Silicon Valley!

At thirty years old, Michael realized that, although successful, he didn’t want to stay in the rat race any longer. He looked to the people further along in his job path and didn’t want their lifestyle. So he took matters into his own hands and bought one rental at a time until he was able to retire!

Now, a successfully real estate investor, author, podcast host, and person in general…Michael spends his time investing, teaching, and giving back!

His advice to an 18/20-year-old is:

Decide what you want in life, if the answer is time/freedom then you need to live on 50% of your income and invest the rest!

the resource he recommends is:

BiggerPockets, YouTube channels, and the U.S. Census Bureau!

If you want to reach out to Michael you can Email him at [email protected]

Here is the link to purchase his book: https://amzn.to/2VvcNAh


Sponsor Email: [email protected]

SUBSCRIBE: https://bit.ly/2Q3EvfE

Blog: https://www.frommilitarytomillionaire.com/start-here/

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Audible: https://amzn.to/2K0wzxL

Join me in the BiggerPockets Pro community! https://www.frommilitarytomillionaire.com/we-recommend-BP-Pro/

Books I recommend

First read: https://amzn.to/2KcTEww

Real Estate Investing: https://amzn.to/2ltPRNm

Real Estate Investing: https://amzn.to/2yxFBNf

Real Estate Investing: https://amzn.to/2IhQ1QI

Building Wealth: https://amzn.to/2ttiwpf

Efficiency: https://amzn.to/2K1eRdy

Efficiency: https://amzn.to/2yvuu7K

Negotiating: https://amzn.to/2tmCyT7

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David Pere

David Pere

David is an active duty Marine, who devotes his free time to helping service members, veterans, and their families learn how to build wealth through real estate investing, entrepreneurship, and personal finance!

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